IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/pra/mprapa/67697.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Islamic monetary policy: Is there an alternative of interest rate?

Author

Listed:
  • Uddin, Md Akther
  • Halim, Asyraf

Abstract

At the advent of global financial crisis conventional monetary policy has failed to regulate the money market and the consequence of which was seen in the global financial and capital market. This paper takes an attempt to give a brief outline of how Islamic monetary policy can be a sustainable alternative to the conventional. In order to understand Islamic monetary policy better we went back to early Islamic period and discussed how money was evolved and monetary policy was performed at that time. Reemergence of Islamic economic system in the latter half of the last century encouraged scholars in this field to have a fresh look at this issue. Comparative analysis shows that Islamic monetary policy can adopt many conventional instruments which are in line with the Shariah guidance such as: Legal Reserve Ratio, Credit Rationing, Selective credit control, Issue of directive, and Moral suasion etc. As interest rate, the key tool of conventional monetary policy regulation, is prohibited in Islamic economic system, the need for sustainable alternative is the order of the day. Unfortunately, Islamic banks and financial institutions set their benchmark based on London Interbank Offered Rate (LIBOR) which raises doubt and controversy of the uniqueness of Islamic finance. Literature shows that this a growing field of knowledge and many theoretical works have been conducted in this area but little empirical work, moreover, very few on alternative benchmark for Islamic economic system. By analyzing literature we propose in our study that GDP growth rate adjusted for inflation can be set as a benchmark for money market instrument and reference for financial and capital market as we argue GDP growth rates reflect real balanced growth potential of an economy as it is correlated with national income, savings, inflation, exchange rate and investment compare to real interest rate, which is fixed in the money market and does not take into account the real sector.

Suggested Citation

  • Uddin, Md Akther & Halim, Asyraf, 2015. "Islamic monetary policy: Is there an alternative of interest rate?," MPRA Paper 67697, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 07 Jun 2015.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:67697
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: https://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/67697/1/MPRA_paper_67697.pdf
    File Function: original version
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Obiyathulla Ismath Bacha, 2008. "The Islamic inter bank money market and a dual banking system: the Malaysian experience," International Journal of Islamic and Middle Eastern Finance and Management, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 1(3), pages 210-226, August.
    2. Mirakhor, Abbas, 1996. "Cost Of Capital And Investment In A Non-Interest Economy," Islamic Economic Studies, The Islamic Research and Training Institute (IRTI), vol. 4, pages 35-47.
    3. Choudhry, Nurun N. & Mirakhor, Abbas, 1997. "Indirect Instruments Of Monetary Control In An Islamic Financial System," Islamic Economic Studies, The Islamic Research and Training Institute (IRTI), vol. 4, pages 28-65.
    4. Woodford, Michael & WALSH, CARL E., 2005. "Interest And Prices: Foundations Of A Theory Of Monetary Policy," Macroeconomic Dynamics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 9(3), pages 462-468, June.
    5. Chapra, Muhammad Umer, 1996. "Monetary Management In An Islamic Economy," Islamic Economic Studies, The Islamic Research and Training Institute (IRTI), vol. 4, pages 2-35.
    6. Hanif, M. Nadim & Sheikh, Salman, 2009. "Central banking and monetary management in islamic financial environment," MPRA Paper 22907, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 25 May 2010.
    7. Tahir, Sayyid, 2013. "Fiscal and Monetary Policies in Islamic Economics: Contours of an Institutional Framework," Islamic Economic Studies, The Islamic Research and Training Institute (IRTI), vol. 21, pages 1-22.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Monetary Policy; Islamic Monetary Policy; Real Interest Rate; GDP Growth Rate; Inflation; Real Exchange Rate; Gross Savings; Foreign Direct Investment and Gross National Income;

    JEL classification:

    • A1 - General Economics and Teaching - - General Economics
    • E4 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates
    • N1 - Economic History - - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics; Industrial Structure; Growth; Fluctuations

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:67697. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Joachim Winter). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/vfmunde.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.