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The Effect of Classroom Games on Student Learning and Instructor Evaluations

Author

Listed:
  • Cebula, Richard
  • Toma, Michael

Abstract

Assuming that instructors of economics are utility maximizers, they may find it useful to engage in classroom behavior that is likely to generate favorable outcomes with respect to student course evaluations. This is especially true if student course evaluations are used in assessing teaching effectiveness for tenure, promotion, and salary decisions. In this paper, we present evidence that the use of a classroom gaming exercise can raise instructor evaluations and enhance student learning outcomes. The tests are conducted in a framework that indirectly controls for grade inflation and considers student attendance and grade expectations as other sources of influence on instructor evaluation ratings.

Suggested Citation

  • Cebula, Richard & Toma, Michael, 2000. "The Effect of Classroom Games on Student Learning and Instructor Evaluations," MPRA Paper 55404, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:55404
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    File URL: https://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/55404/1/MPRA_paper_55404.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. David Romer, 1993. "Do Students Go to Class? Should They?," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 7(3), pages 167-174, Summer.
    2. William E. Becker & William Bosshardt & Michael Watts, 2012. "How Departments of Economics Evaluate Teaching," The Journal of Economic Education, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 43(3), pages 325-333, July.
    3. Durden, Garey C & Ellis, Larry V, 1995. "The Effects of Attendance on Student Learning in Principles of Economics," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 85(2), pages 343-346, May.
    4. Charles A. Holt, 1999. "Teaching Economics with Classroom Experiments: A Symposium," Southern Economic Journal, Southern Economic Association, vol. 65(3), pages 603-610, January.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Gerald Eisenkopf & Pascal Sulser, 2013. "A Randomized Controlled Trial of Teaching Methods: Do Classroom Experiments Improve Economic Education in High Schools?," Working Paper Series of the Department of Economics, University of Konstanz 2013-17, Department of Economics, University of Konstanz.
    2. Gerald Eisenkopf & Pascal Sulser, 2013. "How to Improve Economic Understanding? Testing Classroom Experiments in High Schools," Working Paper Series of the Department of Economics, University of Konstanz 2013-04, Department of Economics, University of Konstanz.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    economic education; pedagogical approaches; classroom games; student performance; instructor evaluation;

    JEL classification:

    • A22 - General Economics and Teaching - - Economic Education and Teaching of Economics - - - Undergraduate
    • A23 - General Economics and Teaching - - Economic Education and Teaching of Economics - - - Graduate
    • A29 - General Economics and Teaching - - Economic Education and Teaching of Economics - - - Other
    • D72 - Microeconomics - - Analysis of Collective Decision-Making - - - Political Processes: Rent-seeking, Lobbying, Elections, Legislatures, and Voting Behavior
    • D74 - Microeconomics - - Analysis of Collective Decision-Making - - - Conflict; Conflict Resolution; Alliances; Revolutions

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