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¿Ha contribuido la población inmigrante a la convergencia interregional en España?
[On the contribution of immigrants to interregional convergence in Spain]

Author

Listed:
  • Fernandez-Leiceaga, Xoaquin
  • Lago-Peñas, Santiago
  • Sánchez, Patricio

Abstract

The very strong foreign immigration in Spain between 1999 and 2009 has generated very limited effects on interregional convergence of per capita GDP and productivity, unlike what happened with the internal migration flows between 1955 and 1979. This article is aimed at explaining why. Results show that while GDP per capita and productivity have fallen in comparative terms in regions attracting a higher proportion of immigrants, these regions have not been the richest and most productive. Immigrants choose to go to regions where there are more job opportunities or acquaintances and family networks, but not necessarily to the most prosperous regions from a macroeconomic standpoint.

Suggested Citation

  • Fernandez-Leiceaga, Xoaquin & Lago-Peñas, Santiago & Sánchez, Patricio, 2013. "¿Ha contribuido la población inmigrante a la convergencia interregional en España?
    [On the contribution of immigrants to interregional convergence in Spain]
    ," MPRA Paper 52381, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:52381
    as

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    File URL: https://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/52381/1/MPRA_paper_52381.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    migrations; inter-regional convergence; neoclassical model;

    JEL classification:

    • J61 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Geographic Labor Mobility; Immigrant Workers
    • O15 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Economic Development: Human Resources; Human Development; Income Distribution; Migration
    • R23 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Household Analysis - - - Regional Migration; Regional Labor Markets; Population

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