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Перераспределительные Конфликты И Факторы Культуры В Новой Политической Экономии
[Redistributive Conflicts and Culture in the New Political Economy]

Author

Listed:
  • Libman, Alexander

Abstract

This note reviews two possible approaches to political economics scholarship - one concentrating on redistribution conflicts under the assumption of homogenous preferences and one focusing on preference heterogeneity and, among other issues, cultural specificty of agents. It discusses both advantages and disadvantages of the approaches and the possible examples of their application

Suggested Citation

  • Libman, Alexander, 2012. "Перераспределительные Конфликты И Факторы Культуры В Новой Политической Экономии
    [Redistributive Conflicts and Culture in the New Political Economy]
    ," MPRA Paper 48192, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:48192
    as

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    File URL: https://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/48192/1/MPRA_paper_48192.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    culture; redistribution; political economics;

    JEL classification:

    • A12 - General Economics and Teaching - - General Economics - - - Relation of Economics to Other Disciplines
    • B41 - Schools of Economic Thought and Methodology - - Economic Methodology - - - Economic Methodology
    • D7 - Microeconomics - - Analysis of Collective Decision-Making

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