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The industrial impact of monetary shocks during the inflation targeting era in Australia

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  • Vespignani, Joaquin L.

Abstract

In this article we analyse the industrial impact of monetary shocks since inflation targeting has been introduced in Australia (1990). These impacts are quantified by constructing a structural vector autoregressive (SVAR) model for a small open economy. Our results show that construction and manufacturing industries exhibit a significant reduction in gross value added (GVA) after an unanticipated rise in the official cash rate. However, the finance and insurance industry, and the mining industry,seem to be unaffected by these shocks.

Suggested Citation

  • Vespignani, Joaquin L., 2012. "The industrial impact of monetary shocks during the inflation targeting era in Australia," MPRA Paper 43686, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 01 Jan 2013.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:43686
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Burrell, Hamish & Vespignani, Joaquin, 2019. "The industrial impact of economic uncertainty shocks in Australia," Working Papers 2019-08, University of Tasmania, Tasmanian School of Business and Economics.
    2. Knop, Stephen J. & Vespignani, Joaquin L., 2014. "The sectorial impact of commodity price shocks in Australia," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 42(C), pages 257-271.
    3. Burrel, Hamish & Vespignani, Joaquin L., 2020. "Industrial Impact of Economic Uncertainty Shocks in Australia: Revised," MPRA Paper 104117, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    4. Hudson, Kerry & Vespignani, Joaquin L., 2015. "Understanding the Taylor Rule in Australia," MPRA Paper 104679, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    5. Mardi Dungey & Renee Fry-McKibbin & Verity Linehan, 2014. "Chinese resource demand and the natural resource supplier," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 46(2), pages 167-178, January.
    6. Mardi Dungey & Renee Fry‐Mckibbin & Vladimir Volkov, 2020. "Transmission of a Resource Boom: The Case of Australia," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 82(3), pages 503-525, June.
    7. Calvin He & Gianni La Cava, 2020. "The Distributional Effects of Monetary Policy: Evidence from Local Housing Markets," RBA Research Discussion Papers rdp2020-02, Reserve Bank of Australia.
    8. Manalo, Josef & Perera, Dilhan & Rees, Daniel M., 2015. "Exchange rate movements and the Australian economy," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 47(C), pages 53-62.
    9. Knop, Stephen J & Vespignani, Joaquin L., 2014. "Industrial Impact of Commodity Price Shocks in Australia," MPRA Paper 104678, University Library of Munich, Germany.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Monetary shocks; Industrial response; Industrial composition and VAR model;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • C32 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Multiple or Simultaneous Equation Models; Multiple Variables - - - Time-Series Models; Dynamic Quantile Regressions; Dynamic Treatment Effect Models; Diffusion Processes; State Space Models
    • E58 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Central Banks and Their Policies
    • E50 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - General

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