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Measuring regional effects of monetary policy in Canada

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  • George Georgopoulos

Abstract

This article measures monetary policy shocks and examines whether the effects of such shocks have differential regional effects in Canada. We identify three possible sources of regional effects: differences in the importance of interest-sensitive industries, differences in the contribution of exports to output and differences in the proportion of small relative to large firms. Using the overnight interest rate as the instrument of monetary policy, we present impulse responses of industry output from a recursive vector autoregression, which incorporates a cointegrating relation. The results show that manufacturing and primary industries are the most interest sensitive. We conduct impulse responses of provincial employment from a monetary contraction. The results show that Newfoundland and Prince Edward Island (PEI), primary industry-based provinces, are strongly and adversely affected by a monetary contraction. Manitoba, Saskatchewan and Alberta, also primary-based, are also affected. Ontario, which is manufacturing-based, is also affected but to a lesser extent. The response of Quebec, New Brunswick, Nova Scotia and British Columbia are not statistically significant.

Suggested Citation

  • George Georgopoulos, 2009. "Measuring regional effects of monetary policy in Canada," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 41(16), pages 2093-2113.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:applec:v:41:y:2009:i:16:p:2093-2113
    DOI: 10.1080/00036840701604362
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Christiano, Lawrence J. & Eichenbaum, Martin & Evans, Charles L., 1999. "Monetary policy shocks: What have we learned and to what end?," Handbook of Macroeconomics,in: J. B. Taylor & M. Woodford (ed.), Handbook of Macroeconomics, edition 1, volume 1, chapter 2, pages 65-148 Elsevier.
    2. Joe Ganley & Chris Salmon, 1997. "The Industrial Impact of Monetary Policy Shocks: Some Stylised Facts," Bank of England working papers 68, Bank of England.
    3. Armour, J. & Engert, W. & Fung, B.S.C., 1996. "Overnight Rate Innovations as a measure of monetary Policy Shocks in Vector Autoregressions," Staff Working Papers 96-4, Bank of Canada.
    4. Jonathan Millar, 1997. "The Effects of Budget Rules on Fiscal Performance and Macroeconomic Stabilization," Staff Working Papers 97-15, Bank of Canada.
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    Cited by:

    1. Giuseppe Cinquegrana, 2014. "Effetti differenziali delle politiche monetarie sugli investimenti delle imprese industriali italiane: un’analisi con metodologia panel," RIVISTA DI ECONOMIA E STATISTICA DEL TERRITORIO, FrancoAngeli Editore, vol. 2014(3), pages 40-78.
    2. Joaquin L. Vespignani, 2013. "The Industrial Impact of Monetary Shocks During the Inflation-Targeting Era in A ustralia," Australian Economic History Review, Economic History Society of Australia and New Zealand, vol. 53(1), pages 47-71, March.
    3. Vespignani, Joaquin L., 2011. "On the differential impact of monetary policy across states/territories and its determinants in Australia: Evidence and new methodology from a small open economy," MPRA Paper 44998, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    4. Jean Louis, Rosmy & Brown, Ryan & Balli, Faruk, 2011. "On the feasibility of monetary union: Does it make sense to look for shocks symmetry across countries when none of the countries constitutes an optimum currency area?," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 28(6), pages 2701-2718.
    5. Angeliki ANAGNOSTOU & Stephanos PAPADAMOU, 2014. "The Impact Of Monetary Shocks On Regional Output: Evidence From Four South Eurozone Countries," Region et Developpement, Region et Developpement, LEAD, Universite du Sud - Toulon Var, vol. 39, pages 105-130.
    6. Vespignani, Joaquin L., 2015. "On the differential impact of monetary policy across states/territories and its determinants in Australia: Evidence and new methodology from a small open economy," Journal of International Financial Markets, Institutions and Money, Elsevier, vol. 34(C), pages 1-13.

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