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Firm Size, Industry Mix and the Regional Transmission of Monetary Policy in Germany

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  • Ivo J. M. Arnold
  • Evert B. Vrugt

Abstract

This paper estimates the impact of interest rate shocks on regional output in Germany over the period from 1970 to 2000. We use a vector autoregression (VAR) model to obtain impulse responses, which reveal differences in the output responses to monetary policy shocks across ten German provinces. Next, we investigate whether these differences can be related to structural features of the regional economies, such as industry mix, firm size, bank size and openness. An additional analysis of the volatility of real GDP growth for the period 1992-2000 includes the Eastern provinces. We also present evidence on the interrelationship between firm size and industry, and compare our measure of firm size with those used in previous studies. We conclude that the differential regional effects of monetary policy are related to industrial composition, but not to firm size or bank size. Copyright Verein für Socialpolitik and Blackwell Publishing Ltd. 2004.

Suggested Citation

  • Ivo J. M. Arnold & Evert B. Vrugt, 2004. "Firm Size, Industry Mix and the Regional Transmission of Monetary Policy in Germany," German Economic Review, Verein für Socialpolitik, vol. 5(1), pages 35-59, February.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:germec:v:5:y:2004:i:1:p:35-59
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Todd Potts & David Yerger, 2010. "Variations Across Canadian Regions in the Sensitivity to U.S. Monetary Policy," Atlantic Economic Journal, Springer;International Atlantic Economic Society, vol. 38(4), pages 443-454, December.
    2. Laura Povoledo, 2016. "Pricing behaviour and the role of trade openness in the transmission of monetary shocks," Working Papers 20161609, Department of Accounting, Economics and Finance, Bristol Business School, University of the West of England, Bristol.
    3. K. Raabe & I. Arnold & C.J.M. Kool, 2006. "Firm Size and Monetary Policy Transmission: A Theoretical Model on the Role of Capital Investment Expenditures," Working Papers 06-14, Utrecht School of Economics.
    4. Masagus M. Ridhwan & Henri L. F. Groot & Piet Rietveld & Peter Nijkamp, 2014. "The Regional Impact of Monetary Policy in Indonesia," Growth and Change, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 45(2), pages 240-262, June.
    5. Georgiadis, Georgios, 2015. "Examining asymmetries in the transmission of monetary policy in the euro area: Evidence from a mixed cross-section global VAR model," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 75(C), pages 195-215.
    6. Raabe Katharina & Arnold Ivo J.M. & Kool Clemens J.M., 2006. "Industries and the Bank Lending Effects of Bank Credit Demand and Monetary Policy in Germany," Research Memorandum 006, Maastricht University, Maastricht Research School of Economics of Technology and Organization (METEOR).
    7. Apergis, Nicholas & Cooray, Arusha, 2015. "Asymmetric interest rate pass-through in the U.S., the U.K. and Australia: New evidence from selected individual banks," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 45(C), pages 155-172.
    8. Georgiadis, Georgios, 2014. "Towards an explanation of cross-country asymmetries in monetary transmission," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 39(PA), pages 66-84.
    9. I. Arnold & C.J.M. Kool & K. Raabe, 2011. "Industry Effects of Bank Lending in Germany," Working Papers 11-21, Utrecht School of Economics.
    10. Todd Potts & David Yerger, 2007. "Changes over Time in New York State's Responsiveness to Monetary Shocks," New York Economic Review, New York State Economics Association (NYSEA), pages 3-17.
    11. Ageliki Anagnostou & Stephanos Papadamou, 2012. "The effects of Monetary Policy shocks across the Greek Regions," ERSA conference papers ersa12p507, European Regional Science Association.
    12. Svensson, Emma, 2012. "Regional Effects of Monetary Policy in Sweden," Working Papers 2012:9, Lund University, Department of Economics, revised 01 Mar 2013.
    13. I. Arnold & C.J.M. Kool & K. Raabe, 2005. "New evidence on the firm size effects in US monetary policy transmission," Working Papers 05-11, Utrecht School of Economics.
    14. Angeliki ANAGNOSTOU & Stephanos PAPADAMOU, 2014. "The Impact Of Monetary Shocks On Regional Output: Evidence From Four South Eurozone Countries," Region et Developpement, Region et Developpement, LEAD, Universite du Sud - Toulon Var, vol. 39, pages 105-130.

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