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Monetary sterilization and dual nominal anchors: some Caribbean examples

  • Khemraj, Tarron
  • Pasha, Sukrishnalall
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    This paper notes that a high sterilization coefficient plus a de facto pegged exchange rate indicates the existence of dual nominal anchors. The econometric evidence presented shows that several Caribbean economies with fixed exchange rate regimes also possess high sterilization coefficients. Given open capital accounts in the various economies, the paper argues that this finding contravenes the money neutrality thesis, which holds that only one nominal anchor can prevail in the long-term. The paper presents a simple theoretical model to explain this phenomenon. The model combines the liquidity preference of commercial banks with an augmented uncovered interest parity equation.

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    File URL: https://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/34503/1/MPRA_paper_34503.pdf
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    Paper provided by University Library of Munich, Germany in its series MPRA Paper with number 34503.

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    Date of creation: 01 Mar 2011
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    Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:34503
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    1. Brissimis, S.N. & Gibson, H.D. & Tsakalotos, E., 1997. "A Unifying Framework for Analysing Offsetting Capital Flows and Sterilisation," DEOS Working Papers 97-06, Athens University of Economics and Business.
    2. Khatkhate, Deena R. & Short, Brock K., 1980. "Monetary and central banking problems of mini states," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 8(12), pages 1017-1025, December.
    3. Bank for International Settlements, 2008. "Monetary and financial stability implications of capital flows in Latin America and the Caribbean," BIS Papers, Bank for International Settlements, number 43, March.
    4. Pierre L. Siklos, 2000. "Capital flows in a transitional economy and the sterilization dilemma: The hungarian experience, 1992-97," Journal of Economic Policy Reform, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 3(4), pages 373-392.
    5. Piti Disyatat & Gabriele Galati, 2005. "The effectiveness of foreign exchange intervention in emerging market countries," BIS Papers chapters, in: Bank for International Settlements (ed.), Foreign exchange market intervention in emerging markets: motives, techniques and implications, volume 24, pages 97-113 Bank for International Settlements.
    6. Jeffrey A. Frankel., 1993. "Sterilization of Money Inflows: Difficult (Calvo) or Easy (Reisen)?," Center for International and Development Economics Research (CIDER) Working Papers C93-024, University of California at Berkeley.
    7. Kouri, Pentti J K & Porter, Michael G, 1974. "International Capital Flows and Portfolio Equilibrium," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 82(3), pages 443-67, May/June.
    8. Joshua Aizenman & Reuven Glick, 2008. "Sterilization, Monetary Policy, and Global Financial Integration," NBER Working Papers 13902, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    9. DeLisle Worrell & Roland Craigwell & Travis Mitchell, 2008. "The behaviour of a small foreign exchange market with a long-term peg-Barbados," Applied Financial Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 18(8), pages 673-682.
    10. M S Mohanty & Philip Turner, 2005. "Intervention: what are the domestic consequences?," BIS Papers chapters, in: Bank for International Settlements (ed.), Foreign exchange market intervention in emerging markets: motives, techniques and implications, volume 24, pages 56-81 Bank for International Settlements.
    11. Roland Craigwell & Kevin Greenidge & Harold Codrington & DeLisle Worrell, 2003. "Economic Resilience with An Exchange Rate Peg; The Barbados Experience, 1985-2000," IMF Working Papers 03/168, International Monetary Fund.
    12. Winston Moore & Roland Craigwell, 2002. "Market Power and Interest Rate Spreads in the Caribbean," International Review of Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 16(4), pages 391-405.
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