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Government bias in education, schooling attainment and growth

Author

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  • Basu, Parantap
  • Bhattarai, Keshab

Abstract

A surprising cross country stylized fact is that a higher public spending on education tends to lower the long run per capita growth rate and schooling returns. This is contrary to the conventional wisdom that education is a major driver of growth. In this paper, we revisit this issue and try to understand these puzzling facts in terms of an endogenous growth model. Our cross country calibration of the growth model predicts that countries with a greater government involvement in education experience lower schooling efforts and lower growth.

Suggested Citation

  • Basu, Parantap & Bhattarai, Keshab, 2011. "Government bias in education, schooling attainment and growth," MPRA Paper 31791, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:31791
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    File URL: https://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/31791/1/MPRA_paper_31791.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    4. William F. Blankenau & Nicole B. Simpson & Marc Tomljanovich, 2007. "Public Education Expenditures, Taxation, and Growth: Linking Data to Theory," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 97(2), pages 393-397, May.
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    6. George Psacharopoulos & Harry Anthony Patrinos, 2004. "Returns to investment in education: a further update," Education Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 12(2), pages 111-134.
    7. Barro, Robert J, 1990. "Government Spending in a Simple Model of Endogenous Growth," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 98(5), pages 103-126, October.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    endogenous growth; public spending on education;

    JEL classification:

    • E62 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Macroeconomic Policy, Macroeconomic Aspects of Public Finance, and General Outlook - - - Fiscal Policy
    • N10 - Economic History - - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics; Industrial Structure; Growth; Fluctuations - - - General, International, or Comparative

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