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Optimal decisions on pension plans in the presence of financial literacy costs and income inequalities

  • Corsini, Lorenzo
  • Spataro, Luca

Pension reforms are on the political agenda of many countries. Such reforms imply an increasing responsibility on individuals’ side in building an efficient portfolio for retirement. In this paper we provide a model describing workers’ choices on the allocation of retirement savings in presence of a) mandatory contribution; b) portfolio decision; c) financial literacy costs. In particular, we characterise the results both from a positive and normative standpoint, by highlighting the determinants of the individual’s choice, with special focus on financial literacy costs and wage level inequalities and by characterizing the optimal contribution rate to mandatory complementary pension schemes.

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Paper provided by University Library of Munich, Germany in its series MPRA Paper with number 30946.

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Date of creation: 2011
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Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:30946
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  1. Mary Ellen Benedict & Kathryn Shaw, 1995. "The Impact of Pension Benefits on the Distribution of Earned Income," ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 48(4), pages 740-757, July.
  2. Marcello D'Amato & Vincenzo Galasso, 2009. "Political Intergenerational Risk Sharing," CSEF Working Papers 216, Centre for Studies in Economics and Finance (CSEF), University of Naples, Italy.
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  7. Annamaria Lusardi & Olivia S. Mitchell, 2009. "How Ordinary Consumers Make Complex Economic Decisions: Financial Literacy and Retirement Readiness," NBER Working Papers 15350, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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  9. Samuelson, Paul A, 1975. "Optimum Social Security in a Life-Cycle Growth Model," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 16(3), pages 539-44, October.
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  11. Creedy, John, 1994. "Two-Tier State Pensions: Labour Supply and Income Distribution," The Manchester School of Economic & Social Studies, University of Manchester, vol. 62(2), pages 167-83, June.
  12. Elsa Fornero & Chiara Monticone, 2011. "Financial Literacy and Pension Plan Participation in Italy," CeRP Working Papers 111, Center for Research on Pensions and Welfare Policies, Turin (Italy).
  13. Jappelli, Tullio & Padula, Mario, 2011. "Investment in Financial Literacy and Saving Decisions," CEPR Discussion Papers 8220, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  14. Vincenzo Galasso, 2008. "The Political Future of Social Security in Aging Societies," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 1, volume 1, number 026257246x, June.
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  16. Annamaria Lusardi & Olivia S. Mitchell, 2011. "Financial Literacy and Retirement Planning in the United States," NBER Working Papers 17108, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  17. Sita Nataraj & John B. Shoven, 2003. "Comparing the Risks of Social Security with and without Individual Accounts," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 93(2), pages 348-353, May.
  18. Raimond Maurer & Olivia S. Mitchell & Ralph Rogalla, 2010. "The Effect of Uncertain Labor Income and Social Security on Life-cycle Portfolios," NBER Working Papers 15682, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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