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See you on Facebook: the effect of social networking on human interaction

  • Antoci, Angelo
  • Sabatini, Fabio
  • Sodini, Mauro

This paper proposes an evolutionary framework to explore the dynamics of social interaction in an environment characterized by online networking and increasing pressure on time. The model shows how time pressure encourages the choice to develop social interactions also through online networking instead of relying exclusively on face to face encounters. Our findings suggest that the joint influence exerted by the reduction in leisure time and the new opportunities of participation offered by web-mediated communication may progressively lead a growing share of the population to adopt networking sites as an indispensable environment for the development of interpersonal relationships.

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File URL: http://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/27661/1/MPRA_paper_27661.pdf
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Paper provided by University Library of Munich, Germany in its series MPRA Paper with number 27661.

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Date of creation: 23 Dec 2010
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Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:27661
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  1. Sabatini, Fabio & Antoci, Angelo & Sodini, Mauro, 2010. "The Solaria Syndrome: Social Capital in a Growing Hyper-technological Economy," AICCON Working Papers 71-2010, Associazione Italiana per la Cultura della Cooperazione e del Non Profit.
  2. Luigino Bruni & Luca Stanca, 2005. "Watching alone: Relational Goods, Television and Happiness," Working Papers 90, University of Milano-Bicocca, Department of Economics, revised Jun 2005.
  3. Antoci, Angelo & Sacco, Pier Luigi & Vanin, Paolo, 2007. "Social capital accumulation and the evolution of social participation," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 36(1), pages 128-143, February.
  4. Bruno S. Frey & Christine Benesch & Alois Stutzer, 2005. "Does Watching TV Make Us Happy?," CREMA Working Paper Series 2005-15, Center for Research in Economics, Management and the Arts (CREMA).
  5. Luigino Bruni & Luca Stanca, 2005. "Income Aspirations, Television and Happiness: Evidence from the World Value Surveys," Working Papers 89, University of Milano-Bicocca, Department of Economics, revised Jun 2005.
  6. Fabio Sabatini, 2008. "Social Capital and the Quality of Economic Development," Kyklos, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 61(3), pages 466-499, 08.
  7. Antoci, Angelo & Sabatini, Fabio & Sodini, Mauro, 2009. "Will growth and technology destroy social interaction? The inverted U-shape hypothesis," MPRA Paper 18229, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  8. Routledge, Bryan R. & von Amsberg, Joachim, 2003. "Social capital and growth," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 50(1), pages 167-193, January.
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