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Competitive Industrial Performance Index and It’s Drivers: Case of Turkey and Selected Countries

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  • Kumral, Neşe
  • Değer, Çağaçan
  • Türkcan, Burcu

Abstract

Competitiveness of manufacturing industry is regarded as one of the basic determinants of long run sustainable growth of a country. Therefore it is important to have an understanding of relative positions of countries in terms of competitiveness and determinants of competitive ability. This study aims to reveal the standing of Turkey in a group of countries and analyze determinants of competitive ability. The competitive industrial performance (CIP) index, taken to be an indicator of relative competitive ability, has been calculated for a sample of 33 countries for years 1985, 1990, 1998 and 2002. Panel data methods then have been employed to reveal sources of competitive ability. Conducted analysis reveals Turkish manufacturing industry to be lagging behind many of the sample countries and presents a grim picture for sustainable development in medium and long run.

Suggested Citation

  • Kumral, Neşe & Değer, Çağaçan & Türkcan, Burcu, 2008. "Competitive Industrial Performance Index and It’s Drivers: Case of Turkey and Selected Countries," MPRA Paper 23097, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:23097
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    manufacturing industry; international competitiveness; panel data;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • N60 - Economic History - - Manufacturing and Construction - - - General, International, or Comparative
    • C23 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Models with Panel Data; Spatio-temporal Models
    • L60 - Industrial Organization - - Industry Studies: Manufacturing - - - General

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