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Heat waves, droughts, and preferences for environmental policy

  • Owen, Ann L.
  • Conover, Emily
  • Videras, Julio
  • Wu, Stephen

Using data from a new household survey on environmental attitudes, behaviors, and policy preferences, we find that current weather conditions affect preferences for environmental regulation. Individuals who have recently experienced extreme weather (heat waves or droughts) are more likely to support laws to protect the environment even if it means restricting individual freedoms. We find evidence that the channel through which weather conditions affect policy preference is via perceptions of the importance of the issue of global warming. Furthermore, individuals who may be more sophisticated consumers of news are less likely to have their attitudes towards global warming changed by current weather conditions.

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File URL: http://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/22787/1/MPRA_paper_22787.pdf
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Paper provided by University Library of Munich, Germany in its series MPRA Paper with number 22787.

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Date of creation: 18 May 2010
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Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:22787
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  1. Daniel Halbheer & Sarah Niggli & Armin Schmutzler, 2006. "What Does it Take to Sell Environmental Policy? An Empirical Analysis of Referendum Data," Environmental & Resource Economics, European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 33(4), pages 441-462, 04.
  2. Khan, M. & Matsusaka, J.G., 1995. "Demand for Environment Goods: Evidence from Voting Patterns on California Initiatives," Discussion Papers 1995_08, Columbia University, Department of Economics.
  3. W. Viscusi, 2009. "Valuing risks of death from terrorism and natural disasters," Journal of Risk and Uncertainty, Springer, vol. 38(3), pages 191-213, June.
  4. Jaeseung Lee & Trudy Cameron, 2008. "Popular Support for Climate Change Mitigation: Evidence from a General Population Mail Survey," Environmental & Resource Economics, European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 41(2), pages 223-248, October.
  5. Dubin, Jeffrey A. & Kiewiet, Roderick D. & Noussair, Charles N., 1991. "Voting on Growth Control Measures: Preferences and Strategies," Working Papers 777, California Institute of Technology, Division of the Humanities and Social Sciences.
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