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Strategies and instruments for organising CSR by small and large businesses in the Netherlands

Author

Listed:
  • Graafland, J.J.
  • Ven van de, B.
  • Stoffele, N.

Abstract

This paper analyses the use of strategies and instruments for organising ethics by small and large business in the Netherlands. We find that large firms mostly prefer an integrity strategy to foster ethical behaviour in the organisation, whereas small enterprises prefer a dialogue strategy. Both large and small firms make least use of a compliance strategy that focuses on controlling and sanctioning the ethical behaviour of workers. The size of the business is found to have a positive impact on the use of several instruments, like code of conduct, ISO certification, social reporting, social handbook and confidential person. Also being a subsidiary of a larger firm has a significant positive influence on the use of instruments. The most popular instrument used by small firms is to let one member of the board be answerable for ethical questions, which fits the informal culture of most small firms. With respect to 2 sectorial differences, we find that firms in the metal manufacturing and construction sectors are more actively using formal instruments than firms in the financial service sector and retail sector. The distinction between family and non-family firms hardly affects the use of instruments.

Suggested Citation

  • Graafland, J.J. & Ven van de, B. & Stoffele, N., 2003. "Strategies and instruments for organising CSR by small and large businesses in the Netherlands," MPRA Paper 20754, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:20754
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    File URL: https://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/20754/1/MPRA_paper_20754.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Spence, Laura J. & Jeurissen, Ronald & Rutherfoord, Robert, 2000. "Small Business and the Environment in the UK and the Netherlands: Toward Stakeholder Cooperation," Business Ethics Quarterly, Cambridge University Press, vol. 10(04), pages 945-965, October.
    2. Janet Adams & Armen Tashchian & Ted Shore, 2001. "Codes of Ethics as Signals for Ethical Behavior," Journal of Business Ethics, Springer, vol. 29(3), pages 199-211, February.
    3. Graafland, J.J., 2001. "Profts and principles: Four perspectives," MPRA Paper 21134, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Comparison of small and large firms; ethics strategies; ethics instruments; organisation of corporate social responsibility;

    JEL classification:

    • M14 - Business Administration and Business Economics; Marketing; Accounting; Personnel Economics - - Business Administration - - - Corporate Culture; Diversity; Social Responsibility
    • L29 - Industrial Organization - - Firm Objectives, Organization, and Behavior - - - Other

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