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Employment protection and regional worker flows in Italy

Author

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  • Naticchioni, Paolo
  • Rustichelli, Emiliano
  • Scialà, Antonio

Abstract

In this paper we point out that the theoretical predictions concern-ing Employment Protection Legislation (EPL) are not fully confirmed by empirical evidence in Italy, a strict EPL country in the nine-ties, according to OECD indexes. In particular, worker and job flow rates are remarkably high, also in comparison with the other Euro-pean countries. Furthermore, the differences in regional worker flow rates -computed on both the social security database and the LFS- are relevant, no matter which measure of worker flows is considered. While EPL is the same across regions, the highest worker flow rates are observed in the South, an area generally recognised as the least dynamic of the country, followed by the Northeast, the Centre and the Northwest. For possible alternative explanations of regional differences investigation focuses on economic structural composi-tion, the black labour market, non-standard contracts, the public sector and self-employment incidence, labour productivity and firm seniority. Using Logit estimates we find that none of these factors can fully explain these differences. Moreover, the predicted nega-tive relation between worker flows and unemployment duration does not seem to hold in the case of Italy.

Suggested Citation

  • Naticchioni, Paolo & Rustichelli, Emiliano & Scialà, Antonio, 2006. "Employment protection and regional worker flows in Italy," MPRA Paper 1690, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:1690
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    File URL: https://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/1690/1/MPRA_paper_1690.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Giuseppe Bertola, 2004. "A Pure Theory of Job Security and Labour Income Risk," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 71(1), pages 43-61.
    2. Paolo Naticchioni & Emiliano Rustichelli & Antonio Scialà, 2003. "Employment protection and regional worker flows in Italy: an assessment of the theoretical predictions," Working Papers - Dipartimento di Economia 1-DEISFOL, Dipartimento di Economia, Sapienza University of Rome, revised 2003.
    3. Blanchard, Olivier & Wolfers, Justin, 2000. "The Role of Shocks and Institutions in the Rise of European Unemployment: The Aggregate Evidence," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 110(462), pages 1-33, March.
    4. Steven J. Davis & John C. Haltiwanger & Scott Schuh, 1998. "Job Creation and Destruction," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 1, volume 1, number 0262540932, January.
    5. Boeri, Tito, 1996. "Is Job Turnover Countercyclical?," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 14(4), pages 603-625, October.
    6. Garibaldi, Pietro & Pacelli, Lia, 2008. "Do larger severance payments increase individual job duration?," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 15(2), pages 215-245, April.
    7. Samuel Bentolila & Giuseppe Bertola, 1990. "Firing Costs and Labour Demand: How Bad is Eurosclerosis?," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 57(3), pages 381-402.
    8. Pierre Cahuc & André Zylberberg, 2004. "Labor Economics," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 1, volume 1, number 026203316x, January.
    9. Ichino, Andrea & Polo, Michele & Rettore, Enrico, 2001. "Are Judges Biased by Labour Market Conditions? The Selection of Firing Litigations for Trial in an Italian Firm," CEPR Discussion Papers 2804, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Francesco Pastore & Joanna Tyrowicz, 2013. "Polish high unemployment and spatial labor turnover. Insights from panel data analysis using unemployment registry data," Working Papers 2013-18, Faculty of Economic Sciences, University of Warsaw.
    2. Pastore, Francesco, 2013. "Primum vivere… Industrial Change, Job Destruction and the Geographical Distribution of Unemployment," IZA Discussion Papers 7126, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    3. Pastore, Francesco & Tyrowicz, Joanna, 2012. "Labour Turnover and the Spatial Distribution of Unemployment: A Panel Data Analysis Using Employment Registry Data," IZA Discussion Papers 7074, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Worker Turnover and Reallocation; Employment Protection; Regional Economics; Italy;

    JEL classification:

    • J65 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Unemployment Insurance; Severance Pay; Plant Closings
    • J68 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Public Policy
    • R1 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - General Regional Economics
    • J63 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Turnover; Vacancies; Layoffs

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