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Croissance et Emploi en Afrique Subsaharienne:Evidence théorique et Faits Empiriques
[Growth and Employment In Subsaharan Africa: Theoretical Evidence and Empirical Facts]

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  • Yogo, Urbain Thierry

Abstract

Abstract This paper provides a theoretical and empirical survey on the link between employment and growth in sub-Saharan Africa countries. Trough this study we shed the light on the majors works that have been done on the subject concerning sub-Saharan Africa and emphasize some stylized facts that could lead to a new path of research. Three main conclusions emerge from this study. First the employment issue in sub-Saharan Africa is mostly a matter of quality than quantity. Secondly the reason of weak employment performances could not be found in labor market rigidities. Third the observed increase of working poor could be explained by the weakness of growth and downward labor demand.

Suggested Citation

  • Yogo, Urbain Thierry, 2008. "Croissance et Emploi en Afrique Subsaharienne:Evidence théorique et Faits Empiriques
    [Growth and Employment In Subsaharan Africa: Theoretical Evidence and Empirical Facts]
    ," MPRA Paper 10474, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 17 Sep 2008.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:10474
    as

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    File URL: https://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/10474/1/MPRA_paper_10474.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Philippe Aghion & Peter Howitt, 1994. "Growth and Unemployment," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 61(3), pages 477-494.
    2. Echevarria, Cristina, 1997. "Changes in Sectoral Composition Associated with Economic Growth," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 38(2), pages 431-452, May.
    3. Gindling, T H, 1991. "Labor Market Segmentation and the Determination of Wages in the Public, Private-Formal, and Informal Sectors in San Jose, Costa Rica," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 39(3), pages 584-605, April.
    4. Sanjeev Gupta & Catherine A Pattillo & Kevin J Carey, 2005. "Sustaining Growth Accelerations and Pro-Poor Growth in Africa," IMF Working Papers 05/195, International Monetary Fund.
    5. Francesco Caselli & Wilbur John Coleman II, 2001. "The U.S. Structural Transformation and Regional Convergence: A Reinterpretation," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 109(3), pages 584-616, June.
    6. Paul Beaudry & Fabrice Collard, 2002. "Why has the Employment-Productivity Tradeoff among Industrialized Countries been so strong?," NBER Working Papers 8754, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Growth; Employment; Working Poor;

    JEL classification:

    • J08 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - General - - - Labor Economics Policies
    • J01 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - General - - - Labor Economics: General

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