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Who Are Poor and Do They Remain Poor?

Author

Listed:
  • Geoffrey M. Ducanes

    (School of Economics, University of the Philippines Diliman)

  • Edita Abella Tan

    (School of Economics, University of the Philippines Diliman)

Abstract

This paper examines the link between poverty and income, on the one hand, and human capital and location, on the other. In the process, the paper proposes a shift in the household indicator of human capital from the usual education of the household head to the education of the most educated member. The paper finds poverty to be most severe and persistent for households with low human capital, and that the effect of human capital varies substantially across locations. Additionally, the paper finds that low human capital households tend to underinvest in the human capital of school-age members, thus likely perpetuating poverty.

Suggested Citation

  • Geoffrey M. Ducanes & Edita Abella Tan, 2014. "Who Are Poor and Do They Remain Poor?," UP School of Economics Discussion Papers 201408, University of the Philippines School of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:phs:dpaper:201408
    as

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    File URL: http://www.econ.upd.edu.ph/dp/index.php/dp/article/view/1461/933
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Edita E. Tan & Kristine S. Canales & Kevin G. Cruz & Jan Carlo B. Punongbayan, 2011. "Why are Boys Falling Behind Girls in Schooling?," UP School of Economics Discussion Papers 201112, University of the Philippines School of Economics.
    2. Arsenio M. Balisacan, 2007. "Why Does Poverty Persist in the Philippines? Facts, Fancies, and Policies," Agriculture and Development Discussion Paper Series 2007-1, Southeast Asian Regional Center for Graduate Study and Research in Agriculture (SEARCA).
    3. Desiree A. Desierto & Geoffrey M. Ducanes, 2013. "Philippines," Chapters, in: Hal Hill & Maria Socorro Gochoco-Bautista (ed.), Asia Rising, chapter 13, pages 385-407, Edward Elgar Publishing.
    4. Balisacan, Arsenio M. & Fuwa, Nobuhiko, 2004. "Going beyond Crosscountry Averages: Growth, Inequality and Poverty Reduction in the Philippines," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 32(11), pages 1891-1907, November.
    5. Tabuga, Aubrey D. & Mina, Christian D. & Reyes, Celia M. & Asis, Ronina D. & Datu, Maria Blesila G., 2011. "Dynamics of Poverty in the Philippines: Distinguishing the Chronic from the Transient Poor," Discussion Papers DP 2011-31, Philippine Institute for Development Studies.
    6. Jonathan Haughton & Shahidur R. Khandker, 2009. "Handbook on Poverty and Inequality," World Bank Publications - Books, The World Bank Group, number 11985.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    human capital; poverty; chronic poverty; regional development; enrolment rates;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • I32 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - Measurement and Analysis of Poverty
    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity
    • I21 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Analysis of Education
    • R11 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - General Regional Economics - - - Regional Economic Activity: Growth, Development, Environmental Issues, and Changes

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