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Female labor force participation, inequality and household well-being in the Second Globalization. The Spanish case

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  • Paula Rodríguez-Modroño

    () (Department of Economics, Quantitative Methods and Economic History, Universidad Pablo de Olavide)

  • Mauricio Matus López

    () (Department of Economics, Quantitative Methods and Economic History, Universidad Pablo de Olavide)

  • Lina Gálvez-Muñoz

    () (Department of Economics, Quantitative Methods and Economic History, Universidad Pablo de Olavide)

Abstract

The 20th century has witnessed an increase in the female participation force in Western countries, especially since 1940s. Explanations behind the more intensive use of female labour are of different nature: globalization forces, the relative female/male wage linked to an increase in education and productivity, the tertiarization of the economy, and other institutional and cultural factors that allow women to control fertility, invest in assets other than the family ones and alter female bargaining power. Since these phenomena are complex and might respond to specific reasons and timing in different countries, it is important to advance on country case studies in a comparative basis. While in other Western countries the increase in female labor participation started to be significant in the 1960s and 1970s, Spanish female activity rates started to rise dramatically in the 1980s, concurrently with the deep integration of Spain in international markets, especially through the entry in the European Union in 1986. In this paper, we will analyze the reasons behind the decalage in female labor force participation in Spain after WWII in comparison with other Western countries, and the subsequent catching up from the 1980s in order to determine the level of influence of Spanish integration in international markets, as well as other economic, institutional and cultural factors.

Suggested Citation

  • Paula Rodríguez-Modroño & Mauricio Matus López & Lina Gálvez-Muñoz, 2016. "Female labor force participation, inequality and household well-being in the Second Globalization. The Spanish case," Working Papers 16.02, Universidad Pablo de Olavide, Department of Economics, Quantitative Methods and Economic History.
  • Handle: RePEc:pab:wphaei:16.02
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Jérôme De Henau & Danièle Meulders & Sile Padraigin O'Dorchai, 2010. "Maybe baby: comparing mothers' employment and child policies in the EU-15," ULB Institutional Repository 2013/13478, ULB -- Universite Libre de Bruxelles.
    2. Jerome De Henau & Daniele Meulders & Sile O'Dorchai, 2010. "Maybe Baby: Comparing Partnered Women's Employment and Child Policies in the EU-15," Feminist Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 16(1), pages 43-77.
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    Cited by:

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    female labor force; globalization; gender analysis; inequality;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • F66 - International Economics - - Economic Impacts of Globalization - - - Labor
    • J1 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics
    • J2 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor
    • N14 - Economic History - - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics; Industrial Structure; Growth; Fluctuations - - - Europe: 1913-
    • N34 - Economic History - - Labor and Consumers, Demography, Education, Health, Welfare, Income, Wealth, Religion, and Philanthropy - - - Europe: 1913-

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