IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/bla/ehsrev/v48y1995i1p89-117.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Women's labour force participation and the transition to the male-breadwinner family, 1790-1865

Author

Listed:
  • SARA HORRELL
  • JANE HUMPHRIES

Abstract

No abstract is available for this item.

Suggested Citation

  • Sara Horrell & Jane Humphries, 1995. "Women's labour force participation and the transition to the male-breadwinner family, 1790-1865," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 48(1), pages 89-117, February.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:ehsrev:v:48:y:1995:i:1:p:89-117
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1111/j.1468-0289.1995.tb01410.x
    Download Restriction: Access to full text is restricted to subscribers.

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Simon Bittmann, 2015. "Ressources économiques des femmes et travail domestique des conjoints : quels effets pour quelles tâches?," Économie et Statistique, Programme National Persée, vol. 478(1), pages 305-338.
    2. Anna Bindler & Randi Hjalmarsson, 2020. "The Persistence of the Criminal Justice Gender Gap: Evidence from 200 Years of Judicial Decisions," Journal of Law and Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 63(2), pages 297-339.
    3. Simon Bittmann, 2015. "Ressources économiques des femmes et travail domestique des conjoints : quels effets pour quelles tâches ?," Sciences Po publications info:hdl:2441/5j2m1g6i7j8, Sciences Po.
    4. Simon Bittmann, 2015. "Ressources économiques des femmes et travail domestique des conjoints : quels effets pour quelles tâches ?," Post-Print hal-01309219, HAL.
    5. Dora L. Costa, 2000. "From Mill Town to Board Room: The Rise of Women's Paid Labor," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 14(4), pages 101-122, Fall.
    6. Jane Humphries, 2006. "`Because they are too menny...` children, mothers, and fertility decline: The evidence from working-class autobiographies of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries," Oxford Economic and Social History Working Papers _064, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.
    7. Gazeley, Ian & Verdon, Nicola, 2014. "The first poverty line? Davies' and Eden's investigation of rural poverty in the late 18th-century England," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 51(C), pages 94-108.
    8. Roderick Floud & Bernard Harris, 1997. "Health, Height, and Welfare: Britain, 1700-1980," NBER Chapters, in: Health and Welfare during Industrialization, pages 91-126, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    9. Radek Szulga, 2014. "A Dynamic Model of Female Labor Force Participation Rate and Human Capital Investment," Journal of Economic Development, Chung-Ang Unviersity, Department of Economics, vol. 39(3), pages 81-114, September.
    10. Robert Allen & Robert C. Allen, 2007. "Engel`s Pause: A Pessimist`s Guide to the British Industrial Revolution," Economics Series Working Papers 315, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.
    11. James Foreman‐Peck & Peng Zhou, 2018. "Late marriage as a contributor to the industrial revolution in England," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 71(4), pages 1073-1099, November.
    12. Jessica S. Bean, 2015. "‘To help keep the home going’: female labour supply in interwar London," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 68(2), pages 441-470, May.
    13. Elise Van Nederveen Meerkerk, 2010. "Market wage or discrimination? The remuneration of male and female wool spinners in the seventeenth‐century Dutch Republic1," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 63(1), pages 165-186, February.
    14. Paula Rodríguez-Modroño & Lina Gálvez-Muñoz & Astrid Agenjo-Calderón, 2015. "The hidden role of women in family firms," Working Papers 15.01, Universidad Pablo de Olavide, Department of Economics, Quantitative Methods and Economic History, revised Dec 2015.
    15. Klein, Alexander, 2009. "Did Children’s Education Matter? Family Migration as a Mechanism of Human Capital Investment. Evidence From Nineteenth Century Bohemia," Economic Research Papers 271185, University of Warwick - Department of Economics.
    16. Paul Atkinson & Brian Francis & Ian Gregory & Catherine Porter, 2017. "Spatial modelling of rural infant mortality and occupation in 19th-century Britain," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 36(44), pages 1337-1360.
    17. Fenske, James & Gupta, Bishnupriya & Yuan, Song, 2020. "Demographic shocks and women’s labor market participation : evidence from the 1918 influenza pandemic in india," The Warwick Economics Research Paper Series (TWERPS) 1286, University of Warwick, Department of Economics.
    18. Helen Paul, 2015. "Editorial: Women in economic and social history: twenty-fifth anniversary of the Women's Committee of the Economic History Society," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 68(2), pages 1-17, May.
    19. Paula Rodríguez-Modroño & Mauricio Matus López & Lina Gálvez-Muñoz, 2016. "Female labor force participation, inequality and household well-being in the Second Globalization. The Spanish case," Working Papers 16.02, Universidad Pablo de Olavide, Department of Economics, Quantitative Methods and Economic History.

    More about this item

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:bla:ehsrev:v:48:y:1995:i:1:p:89-117. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Wiley Content Delivery). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/ehsukea.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    We have no references for this item. You can help adding them by using this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.