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Estimating Intertemporal Allocation Parameters using Simulated Expectation Errors

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  • Martin Browning
  • Sule Alan

Abstract

There is widespread agreement that given currently available data, we cannot accurately estimate the parameters of intertemporal allocation using GMM on Euler equations, whether they be exact or approximate. Our reading of this literature and our own results is that this is a small sample (strictly, short panel) problem. The alternative seems to be to move to full structural modelling. In the current state of the art this is cumbersome, fragile and unable to deal with significant heterogeneity. We present a novel structural estimation procedure that is based on simulating expectation errors; we refer to it as Simulated Residual Estimation (SRE). We develop variants of the basic procedure that allow us to account for measurement error in consumption, the `news` in interest rate realisations and for heterogeneity in discount factors.

Suggested Citation

  • Martin Browning & Sule Alan, 2006. "Estimating Intertemporal Allocation Parameters using Simulated Expectation Errors," Economics Series Working Papers 284, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:oxf:wpaper:284
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    File URL: http://www.economics.ox.ac.uk/materials/working_papers/paper284.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Gang Sun, 2013. "Consumption Inequality and Discount Rate Heterogeneity," Discussion Paper Series, Department of Economics 201318, Department of Economics, University of St. Andrews.
    2. Hardy Hulley & Rebecca Mckibbin & Andreas Pedersen & Susan Thorp, 2013. "Means-Tested Public Pensions, Portfolio Choice and Decumulation in Retirement," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 89(284), pages 31-51, March.
    3. Gang Sun, 2015. "Complete Markets Strikes Back: Is the Reduced-form Measure of Consumption Insurance Reliable?," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 18(4), pages 921-930, October.
    4. Padula, Mario, 2010. "An approximate consumption function," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 34(3), pages 404-416, March.
    5. Waqas Ahmed & Adnan Haider & Javed Iqbal, 2012. "Estimation of Discount Factor ß and Coefficient of Relative Risk Aversion ? in Selected Countries," Working Papers id:5087, eSocialSciences.
    6. Gang Sun, 2012. "Complete Markets Strikes Back: Revisiting Risk Sharing Tests under Discount Rate Heterogeneity," Discussion Paper Series, Department of Economics 201317, Department of Economics, University of St. Andrews, revised 26 Feb 2013.
    7. Diasakos, Theodoros M, 2013. "Comparative Statics of Asset Prices: the effect of other assets' risk," SIRE Discussion Papers 2013-94, Scottish Institute for Research in Economics (SIRE).
    8. Sun, Gang, 2013. "Complete Markets Strikes Back: Revisiting Risk Sharing Tests under Discount Rate Heterogeneity," SIRE Discussion Papers 2013-96, Scottish Institute for Research in Economics (SIRE).
    9. Sun, Gang, 2013. "Consumption Inequality and Discount Rate Heterogeneity," SIRE Discussion Papers 2013-97, Scottish Institute for Research in Economics (SIRE).

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Intertemporal Allocation; Expectation Errors; Life-Cycle Models;

    JEL classification:

    • D12 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - Consumer Economics: Empirical Analysis
    • D91 - Microeconomics - - Micro-Based Behavioral Economics - - - Role and Effects of Psychological, Emotional, Social, and Cognitive Factors on Decision Making

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