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Trade costs, wage difference, and endogenous growth

Author

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  • Akinori Tanaka

    () (Graduate School of Economics, Osaka University)

  • Kazuhiro Yamamoto

    () (Graduate School of Economics, Osaka University)

Abstract

In this paper, we develop an endogenous growth model with two coun- tries in which the international trade of differentiated goods requires dif- ferent trade costs and equilibrium wages in the two countries. If the labor productivity in one country's agricultural sector is higher than that of the other country, the wages will also be higher. In this model, there is a case in which the small country has a higher share of manufacturing firms than the larger country, and the innovation sector locates in the small country, since the cost for production of the manufacturing sector and innovation sector is higher in the large country than in the small country. First, when trade costs are high, the share of manufacturing firms in a large country increases with a decline in trade costs. However, the share then decreases with a decline in trade costs when trade costs are low. Finally, all firms agglomerate in the small country with lower production costs. If trade costs are very high, the innovation sector will locate in the small country. If trade costs take an intermediate value, it will locate in the large country. If trade costs become very low, it will re-locate in the small country. The growth rate moves non-monotonously in a W-shaped curve when there is a reduction in trade costs. This happens because the growth rate is affected by the number of manufacturing firms and the location of the innovation sector.

Suggested Citation

  • Akinori Tanaka & Kazuhiro Yamamoto, 2011. "Trade costs, wage difference, and endogenous growth," Discussion Papers in Economics and Business 11-16, Osaka University, Graduate School of Economics and Osaka School of International Public Policy (OSIPP).
  • Handle: RePEc:osk:wpaper:1116
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    File URL: http://www2.econ.osaka-u.ac.jp/library/global/dp/1116.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Martin, Philippe & I.P. Ottaviano, Gianmarco, 1999. "Growing locations: Industry location in a model of endogenous growth," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 43(2), pages 281-302, February.
    2. Martin, Philippe & Ottaviano, Gianmarco I P, 2001. "Growth and Agglomeration," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 42(4), pages 947-968, November.
    3. Dixit, Avinash K & Stiglitz, Joseph E, 1977. "Monopolistic Competition and Optimum Product Diversity," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 67(3), pages 297-308, June.
    4. Kyoko Hirose & Kazuhiro Yamamoto, 2007. "Knowledge spillovers, location of industry, and endogenous growth," The Annals of Regional Science, Springer;Western Regional Science Association, vol. 41(1), pages 17-30, March.
    5. Gao, Ting, 2007. "Trade costs, international production shifting, and growth," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 51(2), pages 317-335, February.
    6. Minniti, Antonio & Parello, Carmelo Pierpaolo, 2011. "Trade integration and regional disparity in a model of scale-invariant growth," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 41(1), pages 20-31, January.
    7. Yamamoto, Kazuhiro, 2003. "Agglomeration and growth with innovation in the intermediate goods sector," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 33(3), pages 335-360, May.
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    Cited by:

    1. Tadashi Morita & Hajime Takatsuka & Kazuhiro Yamamoto, 2015. "Does Globalization Foster Economic Growth?," The Japanese Economic Review, Japanese Economic Association, vol. 66(4), pages 492-519, December.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    market size; wage differential; growth rates; innovation sector.;

    JEL classification:

    • F0 - International Economics - - General
    • O31 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Innovation and Invention: Processes and Incentives

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