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Incentive Contracts and Efficient Unemployment Benefits in a Globalized World

  • Carsten Helm

    ()

    (University of Oldenburg)

  • Dominique Demougin

    ()

    (European Business School at the EBS University, Wiesbaden)

Several European countries have reformed their labor market institutions. Incentive effects of unemployment benefits have been an important aspect of these reforms. We analyse this issue in a principal-agent model, higher level of unemployment benefits improves the workers' position in wage bargaining, leading to stronger effort incentives and higher output. However, it also reduces incentives for labor market participation. Accordingly, there is a trade-off. We analyze how changes in the economic environment such as globalization and better educated workers affect this trade-off.

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File URL: http://www.vwl.uni-oldenburg.de/download/V-348-12.pdf
File Function: First version, 2012
Download Restriction: no

Paper provided by University of Oldenburg, Department of Economics in its series Working Papers with number V-348-12.

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Length: 22 pages
Date of creation: Aug 2012
Date of revision: Aug 2012
Publication status: Published in Oldenburg Working Papers V-348-12
Handle: RePEc:old:dpaper:348
Contact details of provider: Postal:
26111 Oldenburg

Phone: +49 441 798-4107
Fax: +49 441 798-4116
Web page: http://www.vwl.uni-oldenburg.de/
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  1. Anne Gielen & Marcel Kerkhofs & Jan Ours, 2010. "How performance related pay affects productivity and employment," Journal of Population Economics, Springer, vol. 23(1), pages 291-301, January.
  2. Bernard Caillaud & Patrick Rey & Roger Guesnerie & Jean Tirole, 1987. "Government Intervention in Production and Incentives Theory: A Review of Recent Contributions," Working papers 472, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Department of Economics.
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  15. Gilles Saint-Paul, 2004. "Why are European Countries Diverging in their Unemployment Experience?," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 18(4), pages 49-68, Fall.
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  19. Dominique Demougin & Carsten Helm, 2006. "Moral Hazard and Bargaining Power," German Economic Review, Verein für Socialpolitik, vol. 7, pages 463-470, November.
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  21. Alex Bryson & Richard Freeman & Claudio Lucifora & Michele Pellizzari & Virginie Perotin, 2012. "Paying for Performance: Incentive Pay Schemes and Employees' Financial Participation," CEP Discussion Papers dp1112, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
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  24. Jacobi, Lena & Kluve, Jochen, 2006. "Before and After the Hartz Reforms: The Performance of Active Labour Market Policy in Germany," RWI Discussion Papers 41, Rheinisch-Westfälisches Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung (RWI).
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