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Development Dimensions of High Food Prices

Author

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  • Philip Abbott

    (Purdue University)

Abstract

Measures were taken by many developing country governments to mitigate consequences of high international agricultural commodity prices from mid 2006 until mid 2008, and to block their transmission to domestic markets, with varying degrees of success and cost. A significant international response has focused on emergency relief and renewed efforts to invest in agricultural development. This paper describes and contrasts the approaches taken by national governments versus international organizations and donors to respond to this food crisis, and their consequences. It also explores approaches already underway to enhance aid effectiveness and achieve more rapid agricultural development for smallholder farmers, identifying potential and past roadblocks.

Suggested Citation

  • Philip Abbott, 2009. "Development Dimensions of High Food Prices," OECD Food, Agriculture and Fisheries Papers 18, OECD Publishing.
  • Handle: RePEc:oec:agraaa:18-en
    DOI: 10.1787/222521043712
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Lanie Tomgouani, 2018. "Working Paper 306 - Asymmetric Price Transmission of Rice in Togo," Working Paper Series 2427, African Development Bank.
    2. Mirko Draca & Theodore Koutmeridis & Stephen Machin, 2019. "The Changing Returns to Crime: Do Criminals Respond to Prices?," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 86(3), pages 1228-1257.
    3. Matthias Kalkuhl & Lukas Kornher & Marta Kozicka & Pierre Boulanger & Maximo Torero, 2013. "Conceptual framework on price volatility and its impact on food and nutrition security in the short term," FOODSECURE Working papers 15, LEI Wageningen UR.
    4. SENE, Mr. SEYDINA OUSMANE & SAGHAIAN, Dr. SAYED H., 2014. "Liberalized World Trade and Food Import Under Foreign Exchange Constraints in the CFA's Franc Zone of Sub-Saharan Africa," 2014 Annual Meeting, February 1-4, 2014, Dallas, Texas 162485, Southern Agricultural Economics Association.
    5. Tangermann, Stefan, 2011. "Policy Solutions to Agricultural Market Volatility: A Synthesis," Price Volatility and Beyond 320209, International Centre for Trade and Sustainable Development (ICTSD).
    6. ap Gwilym, Rhys & Ebrahim, M. Shahid, 2013. "Can position limits restrain ‘rogue’ trading?," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 37(3), pages 824-836.
    7. Algieri, Bernardina & Kalkuhl, Matthias & Koch, Nicolas, 2017. "A tale of two tails: Explaining extreme events in financialized agricultural markets," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 69(C), pages 256-269.
    8. de Janvry, Alain & Sadoulet, Elisabeth, 2010. "The Global Food Crisis and Guatemala: What Crisis and for Whom?," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 38(9), pages 1328-1339, September.
    9. Jolejole-Foreman, Maria Christina & Mallory, Mindy L. & Baylis, Katherine R., 2013. "Impact of Wheat and Rice Export Ban on Indian Market Integration," 2013 Annual Meeting, August 4-6, 2013, Washington, D.C. 150595, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    10. Janvry, Alain De & Sadoulet, Elisabeth, 2010. "Agriculture for development in sub-Saharan Africa: An update," African Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, African Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 5(1), pages 1-11, September.
    11. Antonioli, Federico & Santeramo, Fabio, 2017. "Vertical Price Transmission in Milk Supply Chain: Market Changes and Asymmetric Dynamics," 2017 Sixth AIEAA Conference, June 15-16, Piacenza, Italy 261256, Italian Association of Agricultural and Applied Economics (AIEAA).
    12. Jonathan Brooks & Alan Matthews, 2015. "Trade Dimensions of Food Security," OECD Food, Agriculture and Fisheries Papers 77, OECD Publishing.
    13. Chen, Mei-Hsiu, 2010. "Understanding world metals prices--Returns, volatility and diversification," Resources Policy, Elsevier, vol. 35(3), pages 127-140, September.
    14. Schouteten, Joachim & Van Lembergen, Katrien & Molnár, Adrienn & Tarantini, Federico & Heene, Aimé & Gellynck, Xavier, 2014. "The European Food Prices Monitoring Tool as a Prerequisite for more Price Transparency in the Food Chain," 2014 International European Forum, February 17-21, 2014, Innsbruck-Igls, Austria 199387, International European Forum on System Dynamics and Innovation in Food Networks.
    15. de Janvry, Alain, 2009. "Leonard K. Elmhirst Lecture: Agriculture for development: New paradigm and options for success," 2009 Conference, August 16-22, 2009, Beijing, China 53202, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
    16. Abbott, Philip C. & Hurt, Christopher & Tyner, Wallace E., 2011. "What’s Driving Food Prices in 2011?," Issue Reports 112927, Farm Foundation.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    agricultural development; agricultural trade policy; aid effectiveness; emergency relief; food inflation; international commodity prices; price transmission; safety nets;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • O13 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Agriculture; Natural Resources; Environment; Other Primary Products
    • Q17 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Agriculture - - - Agriculture in International Trade
    • Q18 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Agriculture - - - Agricultural Policy; Food Policy

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