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Welfare Implications of Switching to Consumption Taxation

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  • Juan Carlos Conesa
  • Bo Li
  • Qian Li

Abstract

We evaluate a reform of the US tax system switching to consumption taxation instead of income taxation. We do so in an environment that allows for progressivity of consumption taxes through differential tax rates between basic and non-basic consumption goods. The optimal tax system involves substantial subsidies to the consumption of basic goods. We find large efficiency gains in the long run, with a very small increase in inequality. However, once we consider the transitional dynamics associated to the reform, only very low productivity households and a handful of high productivity low wealth households experience welfare gains.

Suggested Citation

  • Juan Carlos Conesa & Bo Li & Qian Li, 2018. "Welfare Implications of Switching to Consumption Taxation," Department of Economics Working Papers 18-09, Stony Brook University, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:nys:sunysb:18-09
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    1. Welfare Implications of Switching to Consumption Taxation
      by Christian Zimmermann in NEP-DGE blog on 2018-10-14 03:03:10

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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • E2 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment
    • D52 - Microeconomics - - General Equilibrium and Disequilibrium - - - Incomplete Markets
    • H21 - Public Economics - - Taxation, Subsidies, and Revenue - - - Efficiency; Optimal Taxation

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