IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/not/notcre/08-02.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Are Imports in Africa Responsive to Tariff Reductions?

Author

Listed:
  • Chris Jones
  • Oliver Morrissey

Abstract

In the 1980’s and 1990’s many African countries liberalised their trade policy, although since the mid 1990s there are countries that did not alter tariffs. This allows us to analyse the effects of trade liberalisation on the change in imports using Difference-in-Differences techniques that allow us to evaluate the impact on imports of trade liberalisation at the general and sector-specific level. During the period of study (1996-2004), Algeria (in 1997), Ethiopia (2001), Egypt (1998), Tanzania (2000) and Uganda (2000) all liberalised their tariffs. These countries act as a ‘treatment’ group. In comparison, Cameroon, Gabon and Madagascar all left their tariffs unchanged. These countries act as our ‘control’ group or counterfactual. We compare the effects on imports for liberalising countries relative to non-liberalising countries, controlling for the timing of liberalisation, trends in import capacity (country effects) and in sector imports across countries (product market effects). Overall, using three methods of measuring imports, there is little evidence that suggests imports increased for the treatment group countries relative to the control group countries. This is true at the general and sector-specific levels.

Suggested Citation

  • Chris Jones & Oliver Morrissey, "undated". "Are Imports in Africa Responsive to Tariff Reductions?," Discussion Papers 08/02, University of Nottingham, CREDIT.
  • Handle: RePEc:not:notcre:08/02
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.nottingham.ac.uk/credit/documents/papers/08-02.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. A. U. Santos-Paulino, 2002. "Trade Liberalisation and Export Performance in Selected Developing Countries," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 39(1), pages 140-164.
    2. Ivohasina Fizara Razafimahefa & Shigeyuki Hamori, 2005. "Import Demand Function: Some Evidence from Madagascar and Mauritius," Journal of African Economies, Centre for the Study of African Economies (CSAE), vol. 14(3), pages 411-434, September.
    3. Romain Wacziarg & Karen Horn Welch, 2008. "Trade Liberalization and Growth: New Evidence," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, vol. 22(2), pages 187-231, June.
    4. Santos-Paulino, Amelia U., 2002. "The Effects of Trade Liberalization on Imports in Selected Developing Countries," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 30(6), pages 959-974, June.
    5. A. P. Thirlwall, 2003. "Trade, the Balance of Payments and Exchange Rate Policy in Developing Countries," Books, Edward Elgar Publishing, number 2957.
    6. Kym Anderson & Will Martin & Dominique van der Mensbrugghe, 2006. "Would Multilateral Trade Reform Benefit Sub-Saharan Africans?," Journal of African Economies, Centre for the Study of African Economies (CSAE), vol. 15(4), pages 626-670, December.
    7. Jeffrey D. Sachs & Andrew Warner, 1995. "Economic Reform and the Process of Global Integration," Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, Economic Studies Program, The Brookings Institution, vol. 26(1, 25th A), pages 1-118.
    8. Amelia Santos-Paulino & A. P. Thirlwall, 2004. "The impact of trade liberalisation on exports, imports and the balance of payments of developing countries," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 114(493), pages 50-72, February.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Tariffs; Difference-in-Difference; liberalisation; Africa;

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:not:notcre:08/02. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Hilary Hughes) or (Thomas Cornelissen). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/cenotuk.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.