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Self-Control, Financial Literacy and Co-Holding Puzzle

Author

Listed:
  • John Gathergood

    () (School of Economics, University of Nottingham)

  • Joerg Weber

    () (School of Economics, University of Nottingham)

Abstract

We use UK household survey data incorporating measures of financial literacy and behavioural characteristics to analyse the puzzling co-existence of high cost revolving consumer credit alongside low yield liquid savings in household balance sheets, which we term the ‘co-holding puzzle’. Approximately 20% of households in our sample co-hold, on average, £6,500 of revolving consumer credit alongside £8,000 of liquid savings. Co-holders are typically more financially literate, with above average income and education. However, we show co-holding is also associated with impulsive spending behaviour on the part of the household. Our results lend empirical support to theoretical models in which sophisticated households co-hold as a means of managing a self-control problem.

Suggested Citation

  • John Gathergood & Joerg Weber, 2012. "Self-Control, Financial Literacy and Co-Holding Puzzle," Discussion Papers 2012-02, The Centre for Decision Research and Experimental Economics, School of Economics, University of Nottingham.
  • Handle: RePEc:not:notcdx:2012-02
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Alessandra Amendola & Alfonso Pellecchia & Luca Sensini, 2016. "Factors Driving the Credit Card Ownership in Italy," International Business Research, Canadian Center of Science and Education, vol. 9(6), pages 131-142, June.

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    Keywords

    consumer credit; self-control; financial literacy;

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