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An Inquiry into Corruption Norms: Survey Data of GRIPS Alumni


  • Tetsushi Sonobe

    (National Graduate Institute for Policy Studies)


Corruption norms are standards shared by members of a society regarding moral attitudes of approval and disapproval toward corruption. Finding out how to deal with corruption norms is a challenge for state building and economic development. This study attempts to deepen our understanding of two aspects of corruption norms. The first is about how precisely the norms specify the distinction between acceptable and unacceptable behaviors. The second is about the empirical validity of the view that corruption norms keep changing and can be changed. This study attempts to offer new insights into these issues by using survey data of alumni of the National Graduate Institute for Policy Studies (GRIPS), Japan, who are mostly government officials in 58 countries.

Suggested Citation

  • Tetsushi Sonobe, 2012. "An Inquiry into Corruption Norms: Survey Data of GRIPS Alumni," GRIPS Discussion Papers 12-15, National Graduate Institute for Policy Studies.
  • Handle: RePEc:ngi:dpaper:12-15

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Sah, Raaj, 2007. "Corruption across countries and regions: Some consequences of local osmosis," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 31(8), pages 2573-2598, August.
    2. Raymond Fisman & Edward Miguel, 2007. "Corruption, Norms, and Legal Enforcement: Evidence from Diplomatic Parking Tickets," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 115(6), pages 1020-1048, December.
    3. Reinikka, Ritva & Svensson, Jakob, 2011. "The power of information in public services: Evidence from education in Uganda," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 95(7-8), pages 956-966, August.
    4. Fisman, Raymond & Svensson, Jakob, 2007. "Are corruption and taxation really harmful to growth? Firm level evidence," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 83(1), pages 63-75, May.
    5. Truex, Rory, 2011. "Corruption, Attitudes, and Education: Survey Evidence from Nepal," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 39(7), pages 1133-1142, July.
    6. Claudio Ferraz & Frederico Finan, 2011. "Electoral Accountability and Corruption: Evidence from the Audits of Local Governments," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 101(4), pages 1274-1311, June.
    7. Benjamin A. Olken, 2007. "Monitoring Corruption: Evidence from a Field Experiment in Indonesia," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 115, pages 200-249.
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