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$1.90 Per Day: What Does it Say?

Author

Listed:
  • Sanjay G. Reddy

    () (Department of Economics, New School for Social Research)

  • Rahul Lahoti

    () (Faculty of Economics, Georg-August University of Göttingen)

Abstract

The World Bank’s global poverty estimates suffer from deep-seated problems arising from a single source, the lack of a standard for identifying who is poor and who is not that is consistent and meaningful. The new choice of an international poverty line of $1.90 (2011 PPP) does not in any way resolve these problems. We present alternate estimates of global, regional and national poverty based on reasoning as to what the Bank’s own method, consistently applied, would entail. These show an increase in the absolute number of poor since 1980 or 1990 for certain choices of poverty line. However, we recommend an approach to income poverty assessment that is altogether different, focusing directly on identifying the real requirements of human beings to attain income-dependent human capabilities.

Suggested Citation

  • Sanjay G. Reddy & Rahul Lahoti, 2015. "$1.90 Per Day: What Does it Say?," Working Papers 1525, New School for Social Research, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:new:wpaper:1525
    as

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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Sanjay Reddy, 2008. "The World Bank's New Poverty Estimates:," Challenge, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 51(6), pages 105-112.
    2. Lahoti Rahul & Jayadev Arjun & Reddy Sanjay, 2016. "The Global Consumption and Income Project (GCIP): An Overview," Journal of Globalization and Development, De Gruyter, vol. 7(1), pages 61-108, June.
    3. Angus Deaton, 2003. "How to Monitor Poverty for the Millennium Development Goals," Journal of Human Development and Capabilities, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 4(3), pages 353-378.
    4. Rahul Lahoti & Arjun Jayadev & Sanjay G. Reddy, 2015. "The Global Consumption and Income Project (GCIP): An Introduction and Preliminary Findings," Working Papers 140, United Nations, Department of Economics and Social Affairs.
    5. Jolliffe, Dean & Prydz, Espen Beer, 2015. "Global Poverty Goals and Prices: How Purchasing Power Parity Matters," IZA Discussion Papers 9064, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    6. Angus Deaton, 2010. "Price Indexes, Inequality, and the Measurement of World Poverty," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 100(1), pages 5-34, March.
    7. repec:epa:cepawp:2014-10 is not listed on IDEAS
    8. repec:pri:rpdevs:spatial_price_differences_in_large_countries-_10-jul_2011_complete is not listed on IDEAS
    9. repec:pri:rpdevs:deaton_poverty_mdg is not listed on IDEAS
    10. repec:pri:rpdevs:presidential%20address%2017january%202010%20all is not listed on IDEAS
    11. Hassoun, Nicole & Subramanian, S., 2012. "An aspect of variable population poverty comparisons," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 98(2), pages 238-241.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

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    Cited by:

    1. Lahoti Rahul & Jayadev Arjun & Reddy Sanjay, 2016. "The Global Consumption and Income Project (GCIP): An Overview," Journal of Globalization and Development, De Gruyter, vol. 7(1), pages 61-108, June.
    2. Amita Majumder & Ranjan Ray & Sattwik Santra, 2016. "Global and Country Poverty Rates, Welfare Rankings of the Regions and Purchasing Power Parities: How Robust Are the Results?," Monash Economics Working Papers 11-16, Monash University, Department of Economics.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • I32 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - Measurement and Analysis of Poverty

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