IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/
MyIDEAS: Login to save this paper or follow this series

Geography and Racial Health Disparities

  • Amitabh Chandra
  • Jonathan Skinner

An extensive literature has documented racial, ethnic, and socioeconomic disparities in health care and health outcomes. We argue that the influence of geography in medical practice needs to be taken seriously for both the statistical measurement of racial disparities, and in designing reforms to reduce disparities. Past research has called attention to disparities that occur within hospitals or provider groups; for example black patients who are treated differently from whites within a hospital. We focus on a different mechanism for disparities; African-Americans tend to live in areas or seek care in regions where quality levels for all patients, black and white, are lower. Thus ensuring equal access to health care at the local or hospital level may not by itself erase overall health care disparities. However, reducing geographic disparities in both the quality of care, and the quality of health care decisions by patients, could have a first-order impact on improving racial disparities in health care and health outcomes.

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.

File URL: http://www.nber.org/papers/w9513.pdf
Download Restriction: no

Paper provided by National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc in its series NBER Working Papers with number 9513.

as
in new window

Length:
Date of creation: Feb 2003
Date of revision:
Publication status: published as Anderson, Norman B., Rodolfo A. Bulatao, and Barney Cohen (eds). Critical Perspectives: on Racial and Ethnic Differences in Health in Late Life, National Research Council 2004. The National Academies Press: Washington D.C.
Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:9513
Note: HE
Contact details of provider: Postal: National Bureau of Economic Research, 1050 Massachusetts Avenue Cambridge, MA 02138, U.S.A.
Phone: 617-868-3900
Web page: http://www.nber.org
Email:


More information through EDIRC

References listed on IDEAS
Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:

as in new window
  1. Angus Deaton & Darren Lubotsky, 2001. "Mortality, Inequality and Race in American Cities and States," NBER Working Papers 8370, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  2. McClellan, Mark & Newhouse, Joseph P., 1997. "The marginal cost-effectiveness of medical technology: A panel instrumental-variables approach," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 77(1), pages 39-64, March.
  3. McClellan Mark & Staiger Douglas, 2000. "Comparing the Quality of Health Care Providers," Forum for Health Economics & Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 3(1), pages 1-26, January.
  4. Oaxaca, Ronald, 1973. "Male-Female Wage Differentials in Urban Labor Markets," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 14(3), pages 693-709, October.
  5. David M. Cutler & Mark B. McClellan, 1998. "What Is Technological Change?," NBER Chapters, in: Inquiries in the Economics of Aging, pages 51-81 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  6. Smith, James P, 1998. "Socioeconomic Status and Health," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 88(2), pages 192-96, May.
  7. Balsa, Ana I. & McGuire, Thomas G., 2001. "Statistical discrimination in health care," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 20(6), pages 881-907, November.
  8. Hurd, Michael D. & McGarry, Kathleen, 1997. "Medical insurance and the use of health care services by the elderly," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 16(2), pages 129-154, April.
  9. Kominski, Gerald F. & Long, Stephen H., 1997. "Medicare's disproportionate share adjustment and the cost of low-income patients," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 16(2), pages 177-190, April.
  10. Blackhall, Leslie J. & Frank, Gelya & Murphy, Sheila T. & Michel, Vicki & Palmer, Joycelynne M. & Azen, Stanley P., 1999. "Ethnicity and attitudes towards life sustaining technology," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 48(12), pages 1779-1789, June.
  11. Julie Lee & Mark McClellan & Jonathan Skinner, 1999. "The Distributional Effects of Medicare," NBER Chapters, in: Tax Policy and the Economy, Volume 13, pages 85-108 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  12. Amitabh Chandra, 2003. "Is the Convergence of the Racial Wage Gap Illusory?," NBER Working Papers 9476, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  13. Alan S. Blinder, 1973. "Wage Discrimination: Reduced Form and Structural Estimates," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 8(4), pages 436-455.
  14. Amitabh Chandra, 2000. "Labor-Market Dropouts and the Racial Wage Gap: 1940-1990," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 90(2), pages 333-338, May.
Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:9513. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: ()

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

This information is provided to you by IDEAS at the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis using RePEc data.