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Exploring the Racial Gap in Infant Mortality Rates, 1920-1970

  • William J. Collins
  • Melissa A. Thomasson

This paper examines the racial gap in infant mortality rates from 1920 to 1970. Using state-level panel data with information on income, urbanization, women's education, and physicians per capita, we can account for a large portion of the racial gap in infant mortality rates between 1920 and 1945, but a smaller portion thereafter. We re-examine the post-war period in light of trends in birth weight, smoking, air pollution, breast-feeding, insurance, and hospital births.

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File URL: http://www.nber.org/papers/w8836.pdf
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Paper provided by National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc in its series NBER Working Papers with number 8836.

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Date of creation: Mar 2002
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Publication status: published as Collins, William J. and Melissa A. Thomasson. "The Declining Contribution Of Socioeconomic Disparities To The Racial Gap In Infant Mortality Rates, 1920-1970," Southern Economic Journal, 2004, v70(4,Apr), 746-776.
Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:8836
Note: CH HE
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  10. Fishback, Price V. & Haines, Michael R. & Kantor, Shawn, 2001. "The Impact of the New Deal on Black and White Infant Mortality in the South," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 38(1), pages 93-122, January.
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  19. Kenneth Y. Chay & Michael Greenstone, 1999. "The Impact of Air Pollution on Infant Mortality: Evidence from Geographic Variation in Pollution Shocks Induced by a Recession," NBER Working Papers 7442, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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