IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/e/pth24.html
   My authors  Follow this author

Melissa Thomasson

Personal Details

First Name:Melissa
Middle Name:
Last Name:Thomasson
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pth24
http://www.sba.muohio.edu/thomasma
Department of Economics Miami University Oxford, OH 45056
513-529-2858
Terminal Degree:1998 Economics Department; Eller College of Management; University of Arizona (from RePEc Genealogy)

Affiliation

Department of Economics
Richard T. Farmer School of Business
Miami University

Oxford, Ohio (United States)
http://www.fsb.muohio.edu/departments/economics

: 513-529-2836
513-529-6992

RePEc:edi:demohus (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles Chapters

Working papers

  1. Katherine Eriksson & Gregory T. Niemesh & Melissa Thomasson, 2017. "Revising Infant Mortality Rates for the Early 20th Century United States," NBER Working Papers 23263, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  2. Keith Meyers & Melissa A. Thomasson, 2017. "Paralyzed by Panic: Measuring the Effect of School Closures during the 1916 Polio Pandemic on Educational Attainment," NBER Working Papers 23890, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  3. Carolyn M. Moehling & Melissa A. Thomasson, 2012. "Saving Babies: The Contribution of Sheppard-Towner to the Decline in Infant Mortality in the 1920s," NBER Working Papers 17996, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  4. Melissa A. Thomasson & Jaret Treber, 2004. "From Home to Hospital: The Evolution of Childbirth in the United States, 1927-1940," NBER Working Papers 10873, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  5. William J. Collins & Melissa A. Thomasson, 2002. "Exploring the Racial Gap in Infant Mortality Rates, 1920-1970," NBER Working Papers 8836, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  6. Melissa A. Thomasson, 2002. "Did Blue Cross and Blue Shield Suffer from Adverse Selection? Evidence from the 1950s," NBER Working Papers 9167, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  7. Melissa A. Thomasson, 2000. "The Importance of Group Coverage: How Tax Policy Shaped U.S. Health Insurance," NBER Working Papers 7543, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

Articles

  1. Thomasson, Melissa A. & Treber, Jaret, 2008. "From home to hospital: The evolution of childbirth in the United States, 1928-1940," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 45(1), pages 76-99, January.
  2. Thomasson, Melissa, 2007. "Comments on Boustan, Frydman, and Murphy," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 67(02), pages 506-510, June.
  3. William J. Collins & Melissa A. Thomasson, 2004. "The Declining Contribution of Socioeconomic Disparities to the Racial Gap in Infant Mortality Rates, 1920–1970," Southern Economic Journal, Southern Economic Association, vol. 70(4), pages 746-776, April.
  4. Thomasson, Melissa A., 2004. "Early evidence of an adverse selection death spiral? The case of Blue Cross and Blue Shield," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 41(4), pages 313-328, October.
  5. Melissa A. Thomasson, 2003. "The Importance of Group Coverage: How Tax Policy Shaped U.S. Health Insurance," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 93(4), pages 1373-1384, September.
  6. Thomasson, Melissa A., 2002. "From Sickness to Health: The Twentieth-Century Development of U.S. Health Insurance," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 39(3), pages 233-253, July.

Chapters

  1. Price V. Fishback & Werner Troesken & Trevor Kollmann & Michael Haines & Paul W. Rhode & Melissa Thomasson, 2011. "Information and the Impact of Climate and Weather on Mortality Rates During the Great Depression," NBER Chapters,in: The Economics of Climate Change: Adaptations Past and Present, pages 131-167 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Blog mentions

As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
  1. Melissa A. Thomasson, 2002. "Did Blue Cross and Blue Shield Suffer from Adverse Selection? Evidence from the 1950s," NBER Working Papers 9167, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

    Mentioned in:

    1. Thesis Thursday: Mathilde Péron
      by Chris Sampson in The Academic Health Economists' Blog on 2017-10-19 11:00:45

Wikipedia mentions

(Only mentions on Wikipedia that link back to a page on a RePEc service)
  1. Melissa A. Thomasson, 2003. "The Importance of Group Coverage: How Tax Policy Shaped U.S. Health Insurance," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 93(4), pages 1373-1384, September.

    Mentioned in:

    1. The Importance of Group Coverage: How Tax Policy Shaped U.S. Health Insurance (AER 2003) in ReplicationWiki ()

Working papers

  1. Carolyn M. Moehling & Melissa A. Thomasson, 2012. "Saving Babies: The Contribution of Sheppard-Towner to the Decline in Infant Mortality in the 1920s," NBER Working Papers 17996, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

    Cited by:

    1. Daniel Aaronson & Fabian Lange & Bhashkar Mazumder, 2011. "Fertility transitions along the extensive and intensive margins," Working Paper Series WP-2011-09, Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago.
    2. D. Mark Anderson & Ryan Brown & Kerwin Kofi Charles & Daniel I. Rees, 2016. "The Effect of Occupational Licensing on Consumer Welfare: Early Midwifery Laws and Maternal Mortality," NBER Working Papers 22456, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Wüst, Miriam, 2012. "Early interventions and infant health: Evidence from the Danish home visiting program," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 19(4), pages 484-495.

  2. Melissa A. Thomasson & Jaret Treber, 2004. "From Home to Hospital: The Evolution of Childbirth in the United States, 1927-1940," NBER Working Papers 10873, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

    Cited by:

    1. Albanesi, Stefania & Olivetti, Claudia, 2015. "Gender roles and medical progress," Staff Reports 720, Federal Reserve Bank of New York.
    2. Seema Jayachandran & Adriana Lleras-Muney & Kimberly V. Smith, 2009. "Modern Medicine and the 20th Century Decline in Mortality: Evidence on the Impact of Sulfa Drugs," NBER Working Papers 15089, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. In Utero, 2006. "Is the 1918 Influenza Pandemic Over? Long-Term Effects of In Utero Influenza Exposure in the Post-1940 U.S. Population," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 114(4), pages 672-712, August.
    4. Stoian, Adrian & Fishback, Price, 2010. "Welfare spending and mortality rates for the elderly before the Social Security era," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 47(1), pages 1-27, January.

  3. William J. Collins & Melissa A. Thomasson, 2002. "Exploring the Racial Gap in Infant Mortality Rates, 1920-1970," NBER Working Papers 8836, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

    Cited by:

    1. Tara Watson, 2005. "Public Health Investments and the Infant Mortality Gap: Evidence from Federal Sanitation Interventions on U.S. Indian Reservations," Department of Economics Working Papers 2005-02, Department of Economics, Williams College.

  4. Melissa A. Thomasson, 2000. "The Importance of Group Coverage: How Tax Policy Shaped U.S. Health Insurance," NBER Working Papers 7543, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

    Cited by:

    1. Jonathan Meer & Harvey S. Rosen, 2002. "Insurance, Health, and the Utilization of Medical Services," Working Papers 117, Princeton University, Department of Economics, Center for Economic Policy Studies..
    2. Ines Läufer, 2014. "Unvollständige Absicherung des Krankheitskostenrisikos in den USA: Erklärungsfaktoren der Attraktivität von Arbeitgeber-Gruppenversicherungen," Otto-Wolff-Institut Discussion Paper Series 01/2014, Otto-Wolff-Institut für Wirtschaftsordnung, Köln, Deutschland.
    3. Jonathan Meer & Harvey S. Rosen, 2003. "Insurance and the Utilization of Medical Services," NBER Working Papers 9812, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Li Sanxi & Yao Dongmin & Xiao Hao, 2013. "Contract Bargaining with a Risk-Averse Agent," The B.E. Journal of Theoretical Economics, De Gruyter, vol. 13(1), pages 285-301, November.
    5. Gulcin Gumus & Tracy Regan, 2007. "Self-Employment and the Role of Health Insurance," Working Papers 0910, University of Miami, Department of Economics.
    6. Craig William Perry & Harvey S. Rosen, 2001. "The Self-Employed are Less Likely to Have Health Insurance Than Wage Earners. So What?," NBER Working Papers 8316, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    7. Jonathan Gruber & Helen Levy, 2009. "The Evolution of Medical Spending Risk," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 23(4), pages 25-48, Fall.
    8. Gumus, Gulcin & Regan, Tracy L., 2007. "Tax Incentives as a Solution to the Uninsured: Evidence from the Self-Employed," IZA Discussion Papers 2866, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    9. Gruber, Jonathan, 2011. "The Tax Exclusion for Employer-Sponsored Health Insurance," National Tax Journal, National Tax Association, vol. 64(2), pages 511-530, June.
    10. Craig William Perry & Harvey S. Rosen, 2001. "Insurance and the Utilization of Medical Services Among the Self-Employed," NBER Working Papers 8490, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    11. Ines Läufer, 2014. "Das Krankenversicherungssystem in den USA: Bestimmungsparameter des Angebots und der Ausgestaltungformen von Arbeitgeber-Gruppenversicherungen," Otto-Wolff-Institut Discussion Paper Series 03/2014, Otto-Wolff-Institut für Wirtschaftsordnung, Köln, Deutschland.
    12. H. Frech & Christopher Whaley & Benjamin Handel & Liora Bowers & Carol Simon & Richard Scheffler, 2015. "Market Power, Transactions Costs, and the Entry of Accountable Care Organizations in Health Care," Review of Industrial Organization, Springer;The Industrial Organization Society, vol. 47(2), pages 167-193, September.
    13. Thomasson, Melissa A., 2004. "Early evidence of an adverse selection death spiral? The case of Blue Cross and Blue Shield," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 41(4), pages 313-328, October.
    14. Ines Läufer, 2014. "Another perspective on the high uninsured-rate in the USA: Crowding out of long term health insurance by the institutional setting of the U.S. health insurance system," Otto-Wolff-Institut Discussion Paper Series 02/2014, Otto-Wolff-Institut für Wirtschaftsordnung, Köln, Deutschland.
    15. Thomas M. Selden, 2009. "The Impact of Increased Tax Subsidies on the Insurance Coverage of Self-Employed Families: Evidence from the 1996–2004 Medical Expenditure Panel Survey," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 44(1).
    16. Thomasson, Melissa A., 2002. "From Sickness to Health: The Twentieth-Century Development of U.S. Health Insurance," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 39(3), pages 233-253, July.
    17. Jonathan Gruber, 2010. "The Tax Exclusion for Employer-Sponsored Health Insurance," NBER Working Papers 15766, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    18. McGarry, Kathleen, 2002. "Public Policy and the U.S. Health Insurance Market: Direct and Indirect Provision of Insurance," National Tax Journal, National Tax Association, vol. 55(4), pages 789-827, December.

Articles

  1. Thomasson, Melissa A. & Treber, Jaret, 2008. "From home to hospital: The evolution of childbirth in the United States, 1928-1940," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 45(1), pages 76-99, January.

    Cited by:

    1. Claudia Olivetti & Stefania Albanesi, 2010. "Maternal Health and the Baby Boom," 2010 Meeting Papers 85, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    2. Martha J. Bailey & William J. Collins, 2011. "Did Improvements in Household Technology Cause the Baby Boom? Evidence from Electrification, Appliance Diffusion, and the Amish," American Economic Journal: Macroeconomics, American Economic Association, vol. 3(2), pages 189-217, April.
    3. Price V. Fishback & Werner Troesken & Trevor Kollmann & Michael Haines & Paul W. Rhode & Melissa Thomasson, 2011. "Information and the Impact of Climate and Weather on Mortality Rates During the Great Depression," NBER Chapters,in: The Economics of Climate Change: Adaptations Past and Present, pages 131-167 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Katherine Eriksson & Gregory T. Niemesh & Melissa Thomasson, 2017. "Revising Infant Mortality Rates for the Early 20th Century United States," NBER Working Papers 23263, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    5. Joseph P. Ferrie & Karen Rolf, 2011. "Socioeconomic Status in Childhood and Health After Age 70: A New Longitudinal Analysis for the U.S., 1895-2005," NBER Working Papers 17016, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    6. Martha J. Bailey & Jason M. Lindo, 2017. "Access and Use of Contraception and Its Effects on Women’s Outcomes in the U.S," NBER Working Papers 23465, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    7. Seema Jayachandran & Adriana Lleras-Muney & Kimberly V. Smith, 2010. "Modern Medicine and the Twentieth Century Decline in Mortality: Evidence on the Impact of Sulfa Drugs," American Economic Journal: Applied Economics, American Economic Association, vol. 2(2), pages 118-146, April.
    8. Carolyn Moehling & Melissa Thomasson, 2014. "Saving Babies: The Impact of Public Education Programs on Infant Mortality," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 51(2), pages 367-386, April.
    9. Carolyn M. Moehling & Melissa A. Thomasson, 2012. "Saving Babies: The Contribution of Sheppard-Towner to the Decline in Infant Mortality in the 1920s," NBER Working Papers 17996, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    10. Ferrie, Joseph & Rolf, Karen, 2011. "Socioeconomic status in childhood and health after age 70: A new longitudinal analysis for the U.S., 1895–2005," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 48(4), pages 445-460.

  2. William J. Collins & Melissa A. Thomasson, 2004. "The Declining Contribution of Socioeconomic Disparities to the Racial Gap in Infant Mortality Rates, 1920–1970," Southern Economic Journal, Southern Economic Association, vol. 70(4), pages 746-776, April.

    Cited by:

    1. Elder Todd E & Goddeeris John H & Haider Steven J, 2011. "A Deadly Disparity: A Unified Assessment of the Black-White Infant Mortality Gap," The B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis & Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 11(1), pages 1-44, June.
    2. Lauren Hoehn Velasco, 2016. "Explaining Declines in US Rural Mortality, 1910-1933: The Role of County Health Departments," Boston College Working Papers in Economics 919, Boston College Department of Economics.

  3. Thomasson, Melissa A., 2004. "Early evidence of an adverse selection death spiral? The case of Blue Cross and Blue Shield," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 41(4), pages 313-328, October.

    Cited by:

    1. Frech, Ted E & Smith, Michael P, 2015. "Anatomy of a Slow-Motion Health Insurance Death Spiral," University of California at Santa Barbara, Economics Working Paper Series qt0w64d54d, Department of Economics, UC Santa Barbara.
    2. John E. Murray, 2011. "Asymmetric Information and Countermeasures in Early Twentieth‐Century American Short‐Term Disability Microinsurance," Journal of Risk & Insurance, The American Risk and Insurance Association, vol. 78(1), pages 117-138, March.
    3. Karsten Jeske & Sagiri Kitao, 2007. "U.S. tax policy and health insurance demand: can a regressive policy improve welfare?," FRB Atlanta Working Paper 2007-13, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta.
    4. Gottlieb, Daniel, 2007. "Asymmetric information in late 19th century cooperative insurance societies," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 44(2), pages 270-292, April.

  4. Melissa A. Thomasson, 2003. "The Importance of Group Coverage: How Tax Policy Shaped U.S. Health Insurance," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 93(4), pages 1373-1384, September.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  5. Thomasson, Melissa A., 2002. "From Sickness to Health: The Twentieth-Century Development of U.S. Health Insurance," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 39(3), pages 233-253, July.

    Cited by:

    1. Iourii Manovskii & Bjoern Bruegemann, 2009. "Fragility: A Quantitative Analysis of the US Health Insurance System," 2009 Meeting Papers 1246, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    2. William J. Collins & Melissa A. Thomasson, 2002. "Exploring the Racial Gap in Infant Mortality Rates, 1920-1970," NBER Working Papers 8836, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Gulcin Gumus & Tracy Regan, 2007. "Self-Employment and the Role of Health Insurance," Working Papers 0910, University of Miami, Department of Economics.
    4. Thomasson, Melissa A. & Treber, Jaret, 2008. "From home to hospital: The evolution of childbirth in the United States, 1928-1940," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 45(1), pages 76-99, January.
    5. Melissa A. Thomasson, 2003. "The Importance of Group Coverage: How Tax Policy Shaped U.S. Health Insurance," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 93(4), pages 1373-1384, September.
    6. Thomas C. Buchmueller & Alan C. Monheit, 2009. "Employer-Sponsored Health Insurance and the Promise of Health Insurance Reform," NBER Working Papers 14839, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    7. Gary Ferrier & Julie Trivitt, 2013. "Incorporating quality into the measurement of hospital efficiency: a double DEA approach," Journal of Productivity Analysis, Springer, vol. 40(3), pages 337-355, December.
    8. Pammolli, Fabio & Riccaboni, Massimo & Oglialoro, Claudia & Magazzini, Laura & Baio, Gianluca & Salerno, Nicola, 2005. "Medical Devices Competitiveness and Impact on Public Health Expenditure," MPRA Paper 16021, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    9. Price V. Fishback, 2010. "Social Welfare Expenditures in the United States and the Nordic Countries: 1900-2003," NBER Working Papers 15982, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    10. Gumus, Gulcin & Regan, Tracy L., 2007. "Tax Incentives as a Solution to the Uninsured: Evidence from the Self-Employed," IZA Discussion Papers 2866, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    11. Joseph P. Ferrie & Karen Rolf, 2011. "Socioeconomic Status in Childhood and Health After Age 70: A New Longitudinal Analysis for the U.S., 1895-2005," NBER Working Papers 17016, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    12. Price Fishback & Samuel Allen & Jonathan Fox & Brendan Livingston, 2010. "A Patchwork Safety Net: A Survey Of Cliometric Studies Of Income Maintenance Programs In The United States In The First Half Of The Twentieth Century," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 24(5), pages 895-940, December.
    13. Emery, J.C. Herbert, 2010. ""Un-American" or unnecessary? America's rejection of compulsory government health insurance in the Progressive Era," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 47(1), pages 68-81, January.
    14. J.C. Herbert Emery, "undated". "America’s Rejection of Compulsory Government Health Insurance in the Progressive Era and its Legacy for National Insurance Today," Working Papers 2008-23, Department of Economics, University of Calgary, revised 01 Apr 2008.
    15. Ferrie, Joseph & Rolf, Karen, 2011. "Socioeconomic status in childhood and health after age 70: A new longitudinal analysis for the U.S., 1895–2005," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 48(4), pages 445-460.
    16. David Zimmer, 2009. "Insurance Arrangements Among Married Couples: Analysis of Benefit Substitution and Compensating Differentials," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 30(4), pages 428-439, December.
    17. Thomasson, Melissa A., 2004. "Early evidence of an adverse selection death spiral? The case of Blue Cross and Blue Shield," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 41(4), pages 313-328, October.
    18. Grignon Michel, 2012. "Roadblocks to Reform: Beyond the Usual Suspects," Centre for Health Economics and Policy Analysis Working Paper Series 2012-01, Centre for Health Economics and Policy Analysis (CHEPA), McMaster University, Hamilton, Canada.

Chapters

  1. Price V. Fishback & Werner Troesken & Trevor Kollmann & Michael Haines & Paul W. Rhode & Melissa Thomasson, 2011. "Information and the Impact of Climate and Weather on Mortality Rates During the Great Depression," NBER Chapters,in: The Economics of Climate Change: Adaptations Past and Present, pages 131-167 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

    Cited by:

    1. Fleitas, Sebastian & Fishback, Price & Snowden, Kenneth, 2016. "Economic Crisis and the Demise of a Popular Contractual Form: Building and Loan Mortgage Contracts in the 1930s," CAGE Online Working Paper Series 275, Competitive Advantage in the Global Economy (CAGE).
    2. Philipp Ager & Markus Bruckner & Benedikt Herz, 2014. "Effects of Agricultural Productivity Shocks on Female Labor Supply: Evidence from the Boll Weevil Plague in the US South," Working Papers 0068, European Historical Economics Society (EHES).
    3. Freedman, Matthew, 2017. "Persistence in industrial policy impacts: Evidence from Depression-era Mississippi," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 102(C), pages 34-51.
    4. Efraim Benmelech & Carola Frydman & Dimitris Papanikolaou, 2017. "Financial Frictions and Employment during the Great Depression," NBER Working Papers 23216, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    5. David S. Jacks & Krishna Pendakur & Hitoshi Shigeoka, 2017. "Infant Mortality and the Repeal of Federal Prohibition," NBER Working Papers 23372, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    6. Miguel Morin, 2015. "The Labor Market Consequences of Electricity Adoption: Concrete Evidence from the Great Depression," Cambridge Working Papers in Economics 1554, Faculty of Economics, University of Cambridge.
    7. Joshua K. Hausman & Paul W. Rhode & Johannes F. Wieland, 2017. "Recovery from the Great Depression: The Farm Channel in Spring 1933," NBER Working Papers 23172, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    8. Ian Wing & Karen Fisher-Vanden, 2013. "Confronting the challenge of integrated assessment of climate adaptation: a conceptual framework," Climatic Change, Springer, vol. 117(3), pages 497-514, April.
    9. Sebastián Fleitas & Price Fishback & Kenneth Snowden, 2015. "Forbearance by Contract: How Building and Loans Mitigated the Mortgage Crisis of the 1930s," NBER Working Papers 21786, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

More information

Research fields, statistics, top rankings, if available.

Statistics

Access and download statistics for all items

Co-authorship network on CollEc

NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 9 papers announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-HEA: Health Economics (6) 2000-02-21 2002-09-21 2004-11-22 2012-04-23 2017-03-26 2017-10-15. Author is listed
  2. NEP-HIS: Business, Economic & Financial History (3) 2012-04-23 2017-03-26 2017-10-15
  3. NEP-EDU: Education (2) 2004-12-12 2017-10-15
  4. NEP-URE: Urban & Real Estate Economics (2) 2004-12-12 2017-10-15
  5. NEP-EVO: Evolutionary Economics (1) 2004-11-22
  6. NEP-IAS: Insurance Economics (1) 2000-02-21
  7. NEP-PBE: Public Economics (1) 2000-02-21
  8. NEP-PUB: Public Finance (1) 2000-02-21

Corrections

All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. For general information on how to correct material on RePEc, see these instructions.

To update listings or check citations waiting for approval, Melissa Thomasson should log into the RePEc Author Service.

To make corrections to the bibliographic information of a particular item, find the technical contact on the abstract page of that item. There, details are also given on how to add or correct references and citations.

To link different versions of the same work, where versions have a different title, use this form. Note that if the versions have a very similar title and are in the author's profile, the links will usually be created automatically.

Please note that most corrections can take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.