IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/
MyIDEAS: Login to save this paper or follow this series

Real Versus Pseudo-International Systemic Risk: Some Lessons from History

  • Michael D. Bordo
  • Bruce Mizrach
  • Anna J. Schwartz

This paper considers the meaning of domestic and international systemic risk. It examines scenarios that have been adduced as creating systemic risk both within countries and among them. It distinguishes between the concepts of real and pseudo-systemic risk. We examine the history of episodes commonly viewed either as financial crises or as evidencing systemic risk to glean lessons for today. We also present some statistical evidence on possible recent systemic risk linkages between the stock markets of emerging countries. The paper concludes with a discussion of the lessons yielded by the record.

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.

File URL: http://www.nber.org/papers/w5371.pdf
Download Restriction: no

Paper provided by National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc in its series NBER Working Papers with number 5371.

as
in new window

Length:
Date of creation: Dec 1995
Date of revision:
Publication status: published as Review of Pacific Basin Financial Markets and Policies, December 1996
Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:5371
Note: ME
Contact details of provider: Postal: National Bureau of Economic Research, 1050 Massachusetts Avenue Cambridge, MA 02138, U.S.A.
Phone: 617-868-3900
Web page: http://www.nber.org
Email:


More information through EDIRC

References listed on IDEAS
Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:

as in new window
  1. Michael Mussa & Morris Goldstein, 1993. "The integration of world capital markets," Proceedings - Economic Policy Symposium - Jackson Hole, Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City, pages 245-330.
  2. Ben Bemanke & Harold James, 1991. "The Gold Standard, Deflation, and Financial Crisis in the Great Depression: An International Comparison," NBER Chapters, in: Financial Markets and Financial Crises, pages 33-68 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  3. Harvey, Campbell R, 1995. "Predictable Risk and Returns in Emerging Markets," Review of Financial Studies, Society for Financial Studies, vol. 8(3), pages 773-816.
  4. Pindyck, Robert S & Rotemberg, Julio J, 1993. "The Comovement of Stock Prices," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 108(4), pages 1073-1104, November.
  5. Henry Kaufman, 1986. "Debt: the threat to economic and financial stability," Proceedings - Economic Policy Symposium - Jackson Hole, Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City, pages 15-26.
  6. Richard M. Levich, 1987. "Financial Innovations in International Financial Markets," NBER Working Papers 2277, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  7. Davis, E. Philip, 1995. "Debt, Financial Fragility, and Systemic Risk," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780198233312.
  8. Eichengreen, Barry & Portes, Richard, 1986. "The Anatomy of Financial Crises," CEPR Discussion Papers 130, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  9. Kenneth Kasa, 1995. "Comovements among national stock markets," Economic Review, Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco, pages 14-20.
  10. Campbell R. Harvey, 1994. "Conditional Asset Allocation in Emerging Markets," NBER Working Papers 4623, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  11. Richard M. Levich & E. Gerald Corrigan & Charles S. Sanford, Jr. & George J. Votja, 1988. "Financial Innovations in International Financial Markets," NBER Chapters, in: The United States in the World Economy, pages 215-277 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  12. Benjamin M. Friedman, 1986. "Increasing indebtedness and financial stability in the United States," Proceedings - Economic Policy Symposium - Jackson Hole, Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City, pages 27-61.
  13. Gary Gorton & Richard Rosen, . "Banks and Derivatives," Rodney L. White Center for Financial Research Working Papers 6-95, Wharton School Rodney L. White Center for Financial Research.
    • Gary Gorton & Richard Rosen, 1995. "Banks and Derivatives," NBER Chapters, in: NBER Macroeconomics Annual 1995, Volume 10, pages 299-349 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  14. Michael R. Darby, 1994. "Over-the-Counter Derivatives and Systemic Risk to the Global Financial System," NBER Working Papers 4801, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  15. Henry Kaufman, 1986. "Debt: the threat to economic and financial stability," Economic Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City, issue Dec, pages 3-11.
  16. Lawrence H. Summers & Hyman P. Minsky & Paul A. Samuelson & William Poole & Paul A. Volcker, 1991. "Macroeconomic Consequences of Financial Crises," NBER Chapters, in: The Risk of Economic Crisis, pages 135-182 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  17. Grossman Richard S., 1993. "The Macroeconomic Consequences of Bank Failures under the National Banking System," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 30(3), pages 294-320, July.
  18. Diamond, Douglas W & Dybvig, Philip H, 1983. "Bank Runs, Deposit Insurance, and Liquidity," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 91(3), pages 401-19, June.
  19. Jacklin, Charles J & Bhattacharya, Sudipto, 1988. "Distinguishing Panics and Information-Based Bank Runs: Welfare and Policy Implications," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 96(3), pages 568-92, June.
  20. Paul Krugman & C. Fred Bergsten & Rudiger Dornbusch & Jacob A. Frenkel & Charles P. Kindleberger, 1991. "International Aspects of Financial Crises," NBER Chapters, in: The Risk of Economic Crisis, pages 85-134 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:5371. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: ()

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

This information is provided to you by IDEAS at the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis using RePEc data.