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Wealth Shocks and MPC Heterogeneity

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  • Dimitris Christelis
  • Dimitris Georgarakos
  • Tullio Jappelli
  • Luigi Pistaferri
  • Maarten van Rooij

Abstract

We use the responses of a representative sample of Dutch households to survey questions that ask how much their consumption would change in response to unexpected, permanent, positive or negative shocks to their home value. The average MPC is in the 2.1-4.7% range, in line with econometric estimates that use housing wealth and consumption realizations. However, our analysis uncovers significant sample heterogeneity, with over 90% of the sample reporting no consumption adjustment to positive or negative wealth shocks. The relation between the MPC from wealth shocks and cash-on-hand is negative, consistent with models with precautionary saving and liquidity constraints.

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  • Dimitris Christelis & Dimitris Georgarakos & Tullio Jappelli & Luigi Pistaferri & Maarten van Rooij, 2019. "Wealth Shocks and MPC Heterogeneity," NBER Working Papers 25999, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  • Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:25999
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    Cited by:

    1. Slacalek, Jiri & Tristani, Oreste & Violante, Giovanni L., 2020. "Household balance sheet channels of monetary policy: A back of the envelope calculation for the euro area," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 115(C).
    2. Pavel Koval & Andrey Polbin, 2020. "Estimation of the consumption function of Russian households using RLMS microdata," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 40(3), pages 2254-2261.
    3. Tobin Hanspal & Annika Weber & Johannes Wohlfart, 2020. "Exposure to the COVID-19 Stock Market Crash and its Effect on Household Expectations," CEBI working paper series 20-13, University of Copenhagen. Department of Economics. The Center for Economic Behavior and Inequality (CEBI).
    4. Hanspal, Tobin & Weber, Annika & Wohlfart, Johannes, 2020. "Exposure to the COVID-19 stock market crash and its effect on household expectations," SAFE Working Paper Series 279, Leibniz Institute for Financial Research SAFE.

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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • D12 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - Consumer Economics: Empirical Analysis
    • D14 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - Household Saving; Personal Finance
    • E21 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Consumption; Saving; Wealth

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