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How Much Consumption Insurance in Bewley Models with Endogenous Family Labor Supply?

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  • Chunzan Wu
  • Dirk Krueger

Abstract

We show that a calibrated life-cycle two-earner household model with endogenous labor supply can rationalize the extent of consumption insurance against shocks to male and female wages, as estimated empirically by Blundell, Pistaferri and Saporta-Eksten (2016) in U.S. data. With additively separable preferences, 43% of male and 23% of female permanent wage shocks pass through to consumption, compared to the empirical estimates of 34% and 20%. With non-separable preferences the model predicts more consumption insurance, with pass-through rates of 29% and 16%. Most of the consumption insurance against permanent male wage shocks is provided through the labor supply response of the female earner.

Suggested Citation

  • Chunzan Wu & Dirk Krueger, 2018. "How Much Consumption Insurance in Bewley Models with Endogenous Family Labor Supply?," NBER Working Papers 24472, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  • Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:24472
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Daminato, Claudio & Pistaferri, Luigi, 2020. "Family labor supply and asset returns," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 124(C).
    2. Claudio Campanale, 2020. "Consumption insurance and education: A puzzle?," Working papers 069, Department of Economics and Statistics (Dipartimento di Scienze Economico-Sociali e Matematico-Statistiche), University of Torino.
    3. Kohei Kubota, 2021. "Partial insurance in Japan," The Japanese Economic Review, Springer, vol. 72(2), pages 299-328, April.
    4. Fabio Blasutto, 2020. "Cohabitation vs Marriage: Mating Strategies by Education in the USA," LIDAM Discussion Papers IRES 2020023, Université catholique de Louvain, Institut de Recherches Economiques et Sociales (IRES).
    5. Claudio Campanale & Marcello Sartarelli, 2018. "“Life-cycle Wealth Accumulation and Consumption Insurance"," CeRP Working Papers 186, Center for Research on Pensions and Welfare Policies, Turin (Italy).

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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • D15 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - Intertemporal Household Choice; Life Cycle Models and Saving
    • D31 - Microeconomics - - Distribution - - - Personal Income and Wealth Distribution
    • E21 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Consumption; Saving; Wealth

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