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Social Ties and Favoritism in Chinese Science

Listed author(s):
  • Raymond Fisman
  • Jing Shi
  • Yongxiang Wang
  • Rong Xu

We study favoritism via hometown ties, a common source of favor exchange in China, in fellow selection of the Chinese Academies of Sciences and Engineering. Hometown ties to fellow selection committee members increase candidates' election probability by 39 percent, coming entirely from the selection stage involving an in-person meeting. Elected hometown-connected candidates are half as likely to have a high-impact publication as elected fellows without connections. CAS/CAE membership increases the probability of university leadership appointments and is associated with a US$9.5 million increase in annual funding for fellows' institutions, indicating that hometown favoritism has potentially large effects on resource allocation.

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Paper provided by National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc in its series NBER Working Papers with number 23130.

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Date of creation: Feb 2017
Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:23130
Note: DEV LS POL
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