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A Simple Model of Subprime Borrowers and Credit Growth

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  • Alejandro Justiniano
  • Giorgio E. Primiceri
  • Andrea Tambalotti

Abstract

The surge in credit and house prices that preceded the Great Recession was particularly pronounced in ZIP codes with a higher fraction of subprime borrowers (Mian and Sufi, 2009). We present a simple model with prime and subprime borrowers distributed across geographic locations, which can reproduce this stylized fact as a result of an expansion in the supply of credit. Due to their low income, subprime households are constrained in their ability to meet interest payments and hence sustain debt. As a result, when the supply of credit increases and interest rates fall, they take on disproportionately more debt than their prime counterparts, who are not subject to that constraint.

Suggested Citation

  • Alejandro Justiniano & Giorgio E. Primiceri & Andrea Tambalotti, 2016. "A Simple Model of Subprime Borrowers and Credit Growth," NBER Working Papers 21942, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  • Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:21942
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Patrick J. Kehoe & Virgiliu Midrigan & Elena Pastorino, 2019. "Debt Constraints and Employment," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 127(4), pages 1926-1991.
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    4. Fernando Ferreira & Joseph Gyourko, 2015. "A New Look at the U.S. Foreclosure Crisis: Panel Data Evidence of Prime and Subprime Borrowers from 1997 to 2012," NBER Working Papers 21261, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    5. Stefania Albanesi, 2016. "Credit Growth and the Financial Crisis: A New Narrative," 2016 Meeting Papers 575, Society for Economic Dynamics.
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    Cited by:

    1. Xavier Freixas & David Perez-Reyna, 2017. "The Gilded Bubble Buffer," Documentos CEDE 015789, Universidad de los Andes - CEDE.
    2. Sapci, Ayse & Vu, Nam, 2017. "Housing Wealth Reallocation Between Subprime and Prime Borrowers During Recessions," Working Papers 2017-03, Department of Economics, Colgate University, revised 19 Sep 2017.
    3. Martino, Ricci & Patrizio, Tirelli, 2017. "Subprime Mortgages and Banking in a DSGE Model," Working Papers 366, University of Milano-Bicocca, Department of Economics, revised 22 Jun 2017.
    4. Robin G. Newberger & Maude Toussaint-Comeau, 2017. "Minority-Owned Banks and Their Primary Local Market Areas," Economic Perspectives, Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago, issue 4, pages 1-31.
    5. Egle Jakucionyte & Swapnil Singh, 2020. "Bowling Alone, Buying Alone: The Decline of Co-Borrowers in the US Mortgage Market," Bank of Lithuania Working Paper Series 78, Bank of Lithuania.
    6. Shirota, Toyoichiro, 2018. "What is the major source of business cycles: Spillovers from land prices, investment shocks, or anything else?," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 57(C), pages 138-149.

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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • E21 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Consumption; Saving; Wealth
    • E44 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates - - - Financial Markets and the Macroeconomy
    • G21 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Banks; Other Depository Institutions; Micro Finance Institutions; Mortgages

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