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Quid Pro Quo: Technology Capital Transfers for Market Access in China

  • Thomas J. Holmes
  • Ellen R. McGrattan
  • Edward C. Prescott

Despite the recent rapid development and greater openness of China's economy, FDI flows between China and technologically advanced countries are relatively small in both directions. We assess global capital flows in light of China's quid pro quo policy of exchanging market access for transfers of technology capital--accumulated know-how such as research and development (R&D) that can be used in multiple production locations. We first provide empirical evidence of this policy and then incorporate it into a multicountry dynamic general equilibrium model. This extension leads to a significantly better fit of the model to data. We also find large welfare gains for China--and welfare losses for its FDI partners--from quid pro quo.

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Paper provided by National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc in its series NBER Working Papers with number 19249.

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Date of creation: Jul 2013
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Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:19249
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  1. Pablo D. Fajgelbaum & Gene M. Grossman & Elhanan Helpman, 2011. "A Linder Hypothesis for Foreign Direct Investment," NBER Working Papers 17550, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  2. Markusen, James R., 2001. "Contracts, intellectual property rights, and multinational investment in developing countries," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 53(1), pages 189-204, February.
  3. repec:idb:brikps:9167 is not listed on IDEAS
  4. Andres Rodriguez-Clare & Natalia Ramondo, 2007. "Trade, Multinational Production, and the Gains from Openness," 2007 Meeting Papers 819, Society for Economic Dynamics.
  5. Branstetter, Lee & Fisman, Ray & Foley, C. Fritz & Saggi, Kamal, 2011. "Does intellectual property rights reform spur industrial development?," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 83(1), pages 27-36, January.
  6. Edward Prescott & Ellen McGrattan, 2008. "Openness, Technology Capital, and Development," 2008 Meeting Papers 111, Society for Economic Dynamics.
  7. Charles R. Hulten & Janet X. Hao, 2012. "The Role Of Intangible Capital in the Transformation and Growth of the Chinese Economy," NBER Working Papers 18405, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  8. Galina Hale & Cheryl Long, 2011. "Are There Productivity Spillovers From Foreign Direct Investment In China?," Pacific Economic Review, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 16(2), pages 135-153, 05.
  9. Lai, Edwin L. -C., 1998. "International intellectual property rights protection and the rate of product innovation," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 55(1), pages 133-153, February.
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