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The Effect of Daughters on Partisanship

  • Dalton Conley
  • Emily Rauscher
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    Washington (2008) finds that, controlling for total number of children, each additional daughter makes a member of Congress more likely to vote liberally and attributes this finding to socialization. However, daughters' influence could manifest differently for elite politicians and the general citizenry, thanks to the selection gradient particular to the political process. This study asks whether the proportion of female biological offspring affects political party identification. Using nationally-representative data from the General Social Survey, we find that female offspring induce more conservative political identification. We hypothesize that this results from the change in reproductive fitness strategy that daughters may evince.

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    File URL: http://www.nber.org/papers/w15873.pdf
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    Paper provided by National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc in its series NBER Working Papers with number 15873.

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    Date of creation: Apr 2010
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    Publication status: published as Conley, D. and E. Rauscher. 2013. “The Effect of Daughters on Partisanship and Social Attitudes toward Women.” Sociological Forum. 28:700-718.
    Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:15873
    Note: CH PE
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    1. Lingxin Hao & V. Joseph Hotz & Ginger Zhe Jin, 2000. "Games Daughters and Parents Play: Teenage Childbearing, Parental Reputation, and Strategic Transfers," JCPR Working Papers 167, Northwestern University/University of Chicago Joint Center for Poverty Research.
    2. Shelly Lundberg & Elaina Rose, 2003. "Child gender and the transition to marriage," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 40(2), pages 333-349, May.
    3. Gordon B. Dahl & Enrico Moretti, 2004. "The Demand for Sons: Evidence from Divorce, Fertility, and Shotgun Marriage," NBER Working Papers 10281, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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