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Detecting Neglected Parameter Heterogeneity with Chow Tests

  • Joachim Zietz

The paper demonstrates through a number of Monte-Carlo experiments that, for the type of cross-section data sets typically encountered in applied economics, Chow tests on sorted variations of the data matrix can detect neglected parameter heterogeneity. The paper focuses on heterogeneity in the behavioral responses of economic actors that belong to different economically meaningful groups, such as the young, middle-aged, and old. Since the suggested methodology is easy to implement yet powerful, its routine use by applied economists would be desirable given the very significant estimation bias that can result from neglecting parameter heterogeneity.

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Paper provided by Middle Tennessee State University, Department of Economics and Finance in its series Working Papers with number 200503.

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Date of creation: Mar 2005
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Handle: RePEc:mts:wpaper:200503
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  1. Brock, William A & Durlauf, Steven N, 2001. "Discrete Choice with Social Interactions," Review of Economic Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 68(2), pages 235-60, April.
  2. Davidson, Russell & MacKinnon, James G, 1992. "A New Form of the Information Matrix Test," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 60(1), pages 145-57, January.
  3. Hall, Alastair, 1987. "The Information Matrix Test for the Linear Model," Review of Economic Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 54(2), pages 257-63, April.
  4. Chesher, Andrew & Spady, Richard, 1991. "Asymptotic Expansions of the Information Matrix Test Statistic," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 59(3), pages 787-815, May.
  5. Thursby, Jerry G., 1992. "A comparison of several exact and approximate tests for structural shift under heteroscedasticity," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 53(1-3), pages 363-386.
  6. Breusch, T S & Pagan, A R, 1979. "A Simple Test for Heteroscedasticity and Random Coefficient Variation," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 47(5), pages 1287-94, September.
  7. Les Godfrey & Chris Orme, . "The Sensitivity of some General Checks to Omitted Variables in the Linear Model," Discussion Papers 92/3, Department of Economics, University of York.
  8. Chesher, Andrew D, 1984. "Testing for Neglected Heterogeneity," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 52(4), pages 865-72, July.
  9. White, Halbert, 1982. "Maximum Likelihood Estimation of Misspecified Models," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 50(1), pages 1-25, January.
  10. White, Halbert, 1980. "A Heteroskedasticity-Consistent Covariance Matrix Estimator and a Direct Test for Heteroskedasticity," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 48(4), pages 817-38, May.
  11. Zietz, Joachim, 2001. " Heteroskedasticity and Neglected Parameter Heterogeneity," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 63(2), pages 263-73, May.
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