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Unemployment Benefits In A Period Of Crisis: The Effect On Unemployment Duration

  • Anne Lauringson
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    The current study shows that the disincentive effects of unemployment benefits exist even during a period of deep recession. The study uses recent data for unemployment benefit recipients in Estonia – a country where the rise in unemployment during the global financial crisis was the highest in the entire European Union. Both a higher benefit level and a longer maximum duration of benefits decrease exits from unemployment to employment. Yet, compared to the pre-crisis period, the effects of unemployment benefits are slightly milder and more homogenous. In addition, unemployed people directed to active measures tend to exhibit a lower hazard of leaving unemployment just before the period of an active measure and during the period of receiving an active measure.

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    File URL: http://www.mtk.ut.ee/sites/default/files/mtk/RePEc/mtk/febpdf/febawb82.pdf
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    Paper provided by Faculty of Economics and Business Administration, University of Tartu (Estonia) in its series University of Tartu - Faculty of Economics and Business Administration Working Paper Series with number 82.

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    Length: 31 pages
    Date of creation: 2011
    Date of revision:
    Handle: RePEc:mtk:febawb:82
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