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The Interaction between Consumption and Health in Retirement

Author

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  • John Karl Scholz

    (University of Wisconsin-Madison)

  • Ananth Seshadri

    (University of Wisconsin-Madison)

Abstract

We study the interaction between consumption and health in retirement. Our main contribution is the estimation of a consumption Euler equation taking health into consideration. The Euler equation is derived from a model of consumption in retirement with three important building blocks of health: health shocks, health as an investment and health as a provider of utility. We estimate the Euler equation using data from the Health and Retirement Study (HRS) and Consumption and Activities Mail Survey (CAMS). The estimates suggest that health is an important determinant of utility. We use the estimated model to study the empirical significance of the three building blocks of health. We find that health shocks play an important role in slowing down the decline of consumption with age in retirement. We also find that including health into the utility function could help explain the heterogeneous consumption-age profiles related to health. Finally, we find that health investments, such as physical exercise, have a significant effect on the evolutions of both health and consumption in retirement.

Suggested Citation

  • John Karl Scholz & Ananth Seshadri, 2016. "The Interaction between Consumption and Health in Retirement," Working Papers wp344, University of Michigan, Michigan Retirement Research Center.
  • Handle: RePEc:mrr:papers:wp344
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Poterba, James M. & Venti, Steven F. & Wise, David A., 2017. "The asset cost of poor health," The Journal of the Economics of Ageing, Elsevier, vol. 9(C), pages 172-184.
    2. Titus Galama & Hans van Kippersluis, 2022. "Human-Capital Formation: The Importance of Endogenous Longevity," Working Papers 2022-009, Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Working Group.
    3. Zhan Cao & Yizhou Tang, 2021. "The effect of increasing retirement age on consumption in China," Asian-Pacific Economic Literature, Asia Pacific School of Economics and Government, The Australian National University, vol. 35(2), pages 136-150, November.
    4. Titus Galama & Hans van Kippersluis, 2022. "Human Capital Formation: The Importance of Endogenous Longevity," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 22-026/V, Tinbergen Institute.

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