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God and the Global Economy: Religion and Attitudes Toward Trade and Immigration in the United States

Author

Listed:
  • Joseph Daniels

    () (Department of Economics, Marquette University)

  • Marc von der Ruhr

    () (Department of Economics, Saint Norbert College)

Abstract

Using the results of a national identity survey, we test the impact of religious affiliation on trade and immigration-policy preferences of U.S. residents while controlling for individual level of skill, political ideology, and other important demographic characteristics. Our results show that religion is an important determinant of international-policy preferences as individuals who are pre-Vatican II Catholic or members of fundamentalist Protestant are more likely to prefer policies that restrict imports and immigration. Religiosity, in contrast, has a seperate effect on moderating attitudes toward immigration. In addition, we find evidence of denominational effects among African Americans in that members of fundamentalist denominations tend to favor policies that restrict imports while others do not, implying that statistical results commonly attributed to racial effects may actually be a religious effect.

Suggested Citation

  • Joseph Daniels & Marc von der Ruhr, 2005. "God and the Global Economy: Religion and Attitudes Toward Trade and Immigration in the United States," Working Papers and Research 0501, Marquette University, Center for Global and Economic Studies and Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:mrq:wpaper:0501
    as

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    File URL: http://www.busadm.mu.edu/mrq/workingpapers/wpaper0501.pdf
    File Function: First version, 2005
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Mayda, Anna Maria & Rodrik, Dani, 2005. "Why are some people (and countries) more protectionist than others?," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 49(6), pages 1393-1430, August.
    2. Delhey, Jan & Newton, Kenneth, 2002. "Who trusts? The origins of social trust in seven nations," Discussion Papers, Research Unit: Social Structure and Social Reporting FS III 02-402, Social Science Research Center Berlin (WZB).
    3. Guiso, Luigi & Sapienza, Paola & Zingales, Luigi, 2003. "People's opium? Religion and economic attitudes," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 50(1), pages 225-282, January.
    4. Tomz, Michael & Wittenberg, Jason & King, Gary, 2003. "Clarify: Software for Interpreting and Presenting Statistical Results," Journal of Statistical Software, Foundation for Open Access Statistics, vol. 8(i01).
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Nurrachmi, Rininta, 2016. "Religion and Economic Performance," MPRA Paper 85582, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised Mar 2018.
    2. repec:zbw:rwidps:0047 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Michael Fertig & Jan Brenner, 2006. "Identifying the Determinants of Attitudes towards Immigrants - A Structural Cross-Country Analysis," RWI Discussion Papers 0047, Rheinisch-Westfälisches Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung.
    4. Makowsky, Michael D., 2011. "Religion, clubs, and emergent social divides," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 80(1), pages 74-87.
    5. Drope Jeffrey & Chowdhury Abdur, 2014. "The puzzle of heterogeneity in support for free trade," Business and Politics, De Gruyter, vol. 16(3), pages 1-27, October.
    6. Jennifer Fitzgerald, 2012. "Social Engagement and Immigration Attitudes: Panel Survey Evidence from Germany," International Migration Review, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 46(4), pages 941-970, December.
    7. repec:bla:intmig:v:51:y:2017:i:2:p:416-451 is not listed on IDEAS
    8. repec:gam:jsusta:v:9:y:2017:i:7:p:1170-:d:103903 is not listed on IDEAS
    9. Brenner, Jan & Fertig, Michael, 2006. "Identifying the Determinants of Attitudes towards Immigrants: A Structural Cross-Country Analysis," IZA Discussion Papers 2306, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • F0 - International Economics - - General
    • H0 - Public Economics - - General

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