IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/mon/ceddtr/156.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Croissance économique, commerce international et emploi décent : cas du Burkina Faso

Author

Listed:
  • Adama Zerbo

    (GED, Université Montesquieu Bordeaux IV)

Abstract

A cause notamment de l’absence de méthodes adéquates permettant de l’examiner profondément, la relation entre la croissance économique et l’emploi décent reste insuffisamment explorée. Pour ce faire, ce papier propose une nouvelle approche d’analyse de ce lien, permettant de décomposer l’élasticité-revenu de l’emploi décent comme étant la moyenne des effets-intensité des facteurs macroéconomiques de la croissance, pondérés par leurs effets-quantité. Cette nouvelle approche permet, entre autres, d’appréhender les contributions des domaines/politiques économiques à l’intensité de la croissance en emploi, ainsi que de cerner les leviers macroéconomiques sur lesquels il conviendrait d’agir afin d’enrichir davantage la croissance économique en emploi décent. L’examen du cas du Burkina Faso à partir de cette nouvelle approche montre, d’une part, qu’aucun facteur de la croissance économique n’a joué véritablement le rôle de moteur de l’emploi décent et, d’autre part, que l’ouverture commerciale de ce pays appauvrit la croissance économique en emploi protégé. In part because of lack of analytical method to examine deeply the relationship between economic growth and decent employment, it is still insufficiently explored. Thus, this paper proposes a new analytical approach of this link, to decompose the elasticity of decent employment in relation of national income, as the average of intensity effects of growth factors, weighted by their quantity effects. This new approach allows assessing contributions of economic policies to growth intensity in employment, identifying macroeconomic levers on which action should be taken so that growth will be increasingly rich in decent work. Examination of the case of Burkina Faso based on this new approach shows that, a hand, there is no growth factor in this country, which is a motor of decent employment and, secondly, the international trade of this country impoverishes growth economic in decent employment. (Full text in french)

Suggested Citation

  • Adama Zerbo, 2010. "Croissance économique, commerce international et emploi décent : cas du Burkina Faso," Documents de travail 156, Groupe d'Economie du Développement de l'Université Montesquieu Bordeaux IV.
  • Handle: RePEc:mon:ceddtr:156
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    To our knowledge, this item is not available for download. To find whether it is available, there are three options:
    1. Check below whether another version of this item is available online.
    2. Check on the provider's web page whether it is in fact available.
    3. Perform a search for a similarly titled item that would be available.

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Ann Harrison, 2007. "Globalization and Poverty," NBER Books, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc, number harr06-1, September.
    2. Ravallion, Martin & Chen, Shaohua, 1997. "What Can New Survey Data Tell Us about Recent Changes in Distribution and Poverty?," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, vol. 11(2), pages 357-382, May.
    3. Edwards, Sebastian, 1998. "Openness, Productivity and Growth: What Do We Really Know?," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 108(447), pages 383-398, March.
    4. Jeffrey D. Sachs & Andrew Warner, 1995. "Economic Reform and the Process of Global Integration," Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, Economic Studies Program, The Brookings Institution, vol. 26(1, 25th A), pages 1-118.
    5. David Dollar & Aart Kraay, 2004. "Trade, Growth, and Poverty," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 114(493), pages 22-49, February.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Adama Zerbo, 2011. "Quels itinéraires d'intégration au commerce mondial pour plus d'emplois décents ?," Documents de travail 166, Groupe d'Economie du Développement de l'Université Montesquieu Bordeaux IV.

    Most related items

    These are the items that most often cite the same works as this one and are cited by the same works as this one.
    1. Philippe Aghion & Robin Burgess & Stephen J. Redding & Fabrizio Zilibotti, 2008. "The Unequal Effects of Liberalization: Evidence from Dismantling the License Raj in India," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 98(4), pages 1397-1412, September.
    2. Francisco Rodríguez, 2006. "Openness and Growth: What Have We Learned?," Wesleyan Economics Working Papers 2006-011, Wesleyan University, Department of Economics.
    3. Winters, L. Alan, 2000. "Trade, Trade Policy and Poverty: What Are The Links?," CEPR Discussion Papers 2382, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    4. Chang, Roberto & Kaltani, Linda & Loayza, Norman V., 2009. "Openness can be good for growth: The role of policy complementarities," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 90(1), pages 33-49, September.
    5. Kuo-Hsing Kuo & Cheng-Te Lee & Chen Fang, 2014. "Free Trade and Economic Growth," Australian Economic Papers, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 53(1-2), pages 69-76, June.
    6. Rao, B. Bhaskara & Vadlamannati, Krishna Chaitanya, 2011. "Globalization and growth in the low income African countries with the extreme bounds analysis," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 28(3), pages 795-805, May.
    7. Gurgul, Henryk & Lach, Łukasz, 2014. "Globalization and economic growth: Evidence from two decades of transition in CEE," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 36(C), pages 99-107.
    8. Hur, Jung & Park, Cheolbeom, 2012. "Do Free Trade Agreements Increase Economic Growth of the Member Countries?," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 40(7), pages 1283-1294.
    9. Chen,Derek Hung Chiat & Ranaweera,Thilakaratna & Storozhuk, Andriy, 2004. "The RMSM-S+P : a minimal poverty module for the RMSM-X," Policy Research Working Paper Series 3304, The World Bank.
    10. Christine Mutz & Thomas Ziesemer, 2008. "Simultaneous estimation of income and price elasticities of export demand, scale economies and total factor productivity growth for Brazil," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 40(22), pages 2921-2937.
    11. Remco H. Oostendorp, 2009. "Globalization and the Gender Wage Gap," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, vol. 23(1), pages 141-161, January.
    12. Robert Mullings & Aruneema Mahabir, 2016. "Growth by Destination: The Role of Trade in Africa’s Recent Growth Episode," NBS Discussion Papers in Economics 2016/01, Economics, Nottingham Business School, Nottingham Trent University.
    13. Nissanke, Machiko & Thorbecke, Erik, 2006. "Channels and policy debate in the globalization-inequality-poverty nexus," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 34(8), pages 1338-1360, August.
    14. Khan, Rana Ejaz Ali & Sattar, Rashid, 2010. "Trade, Growth and Povety: A Case of Pakistan," MPRA Paper 20904, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    15. Keshmeer Makun, 2017. "Trade Openness and Economic Growth in Malaysia," Foreign Trade Review, , vol. 52(3), pages 157-170, August.
    16. Charles Ackah, & Oliver Morrissey, 2007. "Trade Liberalisation is Good for You if You are Rich," Discussion Papers 07/01, University of Nottingham, CREDIT.
    17. Raihan, Selim, 2004. "Trade Barriers in a Global Perspective," Centre on Regulation and Competition (CRC) Working papers 30618, University of Manchester, Institute for Development Policy and Management (IDPM).
    18. Mullings, Robert & Mahabir, Aruneema, 2018. "Growth by Destination: The Role of Trade in Africa’s Recent Growth Episode," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 102(C), pages 243-261.
    19. Lin, Faqin & Sim, Nicholas C.S., 2013. "Trade, income and the Baltic Dry Index," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 59(C), pages 1-18.
    20. Tarlok Singh, 2010. "Does International Trade Cause Economic Growth? A Survey," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 33(11), pages 1517-1564, November.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • F16 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Trade and Labor Market Interactions
    • J23 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Labor Demand

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:mon:ceddtr:156. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: . General contact details of provider: .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a bibliographic reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: The email address of this maintainer does not seem to be valid anymore. Please ask the person in charge to update the entry or send us the correct address (email available below). General contact details of provider: .

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.