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Changes in Global Trade Patterns and Women's Employment in Manufacturing: an Analysis over the Period of Asianization and De-industrialization

Author

Listed:
  • Burca Kizilirmak

    () (Department of Economics, Ankara University)

  • Emel Memis

    () (Department of Economics, Ankara University)

  • Sirin Saracoglu

    () (Department of Economics, METU)

  • Ebru Voyvoda

    () (Department of Economics, METU)

Abstract

The purpose of this study is to explore the employment effects of changes in manufacturing output resulting from changes in trade patterns over the period 1995-2006. For 30 countries (21 OECD and 9 non-OECD countries) we estimate the changes in embodied labor content due to trade using the factor-content analysis by breaking up the sources of these changes between the trade with the North, the South and China. We also decompose changes in employment into its components as changes within and across sectors. Our results present a net negative impact of trade on total employment in 30 countries over the period of analysis (despite employment gains in 17 countries). In all countries (except for Philippines and Republic of Korea) trade with China has a negative impact on total employment with a stronger negative effect on women’s employment. Employment losses in the South due to surge in imports from China are coupled with declining exports to the North as many countries in the North shift their imports to emerging economies in Asia. Decomposition results indicate that decline in the share of women’s employment is mainly due to shifts between sectors rather than within sector changes. Changes in women’s employment are still highly dependent on the movements in ‘traditional’ manufacturing sectors including food, textiles and wearing apparel.

Suggested Citation

  • Burca Kizilirmak & Emel Memis & Sirin Saracoglu & Ebru Voyvoda, 2014. "Changes in Global Trade Patterns and Women's Employment in Manufacturing: an Analysis over the Period of Asianization and De-industrialization," ERC Working Papers 1401, ERC - Economic Research Center, Middle East Technical University, revised Jan 2014.
  • Handle: RePEc:met:wpaper:1401
    as

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    File URL: http://www.erc.metu.edu.tr/menu/series14/1401.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    North-South trade; decomposition analysis; factor content analysis; gender bias.;

    JEL classification:

    • F16 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Trade and Labor Market Interactions
    • J16 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Gender; Non-labor Discrimination
    • J21 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Labor Force and Employment, Size, and Structure

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