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The Determinants of Earning Differentials in Ankara and Istanbul

  • I.Semih Akçomak

    ()

    (MERIT, Maastricht University)

  • Zehra Kasnakoglu

In this study, an attempt is made to compare and contrast the determinants of earnings differentials in Ankara and Istanbul. The determinants of earnings differentials are first examined with semi-logarithmic single equation models based on the basic human capital approach. Secondly, extended models are formed in which all the variables are expressed as dummy variables. In general, the average per hour earnings in Istanbul, is higher than in Ankara. It is found that age, gender, education and job status have significant effects on the explanatory power of the model, whereas occupation and marital status have only limited effect.

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File URL: http://www.erc.metu.edu.tr/menu/series01/0102.pdf
File Function: First version, 2001
Download Restriction: no

Paper provided by ERC - Economic Research Center, Middle East Technical University in its series ERC Working Papers with number 0102.

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Length: 19 pages
Date of creation: Feb 2001
Date of revision: Feb 2001
Handle: RePEc:met:wpaper:0102
Contact details of provider: Postal: Ankara 06531
Phone: +90 (312) 210 2003
Fax: (312) 210 1244
Web page: http://www.erc.metu.edu.tr
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  1. Behrman, Jere R & Wolfe, Barbara L & Blau, David M, 1985. "Human Capital and Earnings Distribution in a Developing Country: The Case of Prerevolutionary Nicaragua," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 34(1), pages 1-29, October.
  2. Sanders Korenman & David Neumark, 1991. "Does Marriage Really Make Men More Productive?," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 26(2), pages 282-307.
  3. Peter Rupert & Mark E. Schweitzer & Eric Severance-Lossin & Erin Turner, 1996. "Earnings, education and experience," Economic Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland, issue Q IV, pages 2-12.
  4. Dolton, Peter J & Makepeace, Gerald H, 1987. "Marital Status, Child Rearing and Earnings Differentials in the Graduate Labour Market," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 97(388), pages 897-922, December.
  5. Pradeep Kumar & Mary Lou Coates, 1982. "Occupational Earnings, Compensating Differentials, and Human Capital: An Empirical Study," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 15(3), pages 442-57, August.
  6. Tachibanaki, Toshiaki, 1980. "Education, occupation and earnings : A recursive approach for France," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 13(1), pages 103-127, January.
  7. Behrman, Jere R & Taubman, Paul, 1976. "Intergenerational Transmission of Income and Wealth," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 66(2), pages 436-40, May.
  8. Morgenstern, Richard D, 1973. "Direct and Indirect Effects on Earnings of Schooling and Socio-Economic Background," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 55(2), pages 225-33, May.
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