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Characteristics of demand for antibiotics in primary care: an almost ideal demand system approach


  • Massimo Filippini

    (Department of Management, Technology and Economics, ETH Zurich, Switzerland)

  • Giuliano Masiero

    () (Department of Economics and Technology Management, University of Bergamo, Italy)

  • Karine Moschetti

    (Department of Economics, University of Lugano, Switzerland)


We model demand for different classes of antibiotics used for respiratory infections in outpatient care using a linear approximate almost ideal demand system approach. We compute elasticities to socioeconomic determinants of consumption and own- and cross- price elasticities between different groups of antibiotics. We find significant elasticities between newer/more expensive generations and older/less expensive generations of antibiotics. The larger use of more expensive antibiotics is also associated with the self-dispensing status of practices, ceteris paribus.

Suggested Citation

  • Massimo Filippini & Giuliano Masiero & Karine Moschetti, 2007. "Characteristics of demand for antibiotics in primary care: an almost ideal demand system approach," Quaderni della facoltà di Scienze economiche dell'Università di Lugano 0701, USI Università della Svizzera italiana.
  • Handle: RePEc:lug:wpaper:0701

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Sara Ellison Fisher & Iain Cockburn & Zvi Griliches & Jerry Hausman, 1997. "Characteristics of Demand for Pharmaceutical Products: An Examination of Four Cephalosporins," RAND Journal of Economics, The RAND Corporation, vol. 28(3), pages 426-446, Autumn.
    2. Chalfant, James A, 1987. "A Globally Flexible, Almost Ideal Demand System," Journal of Business & Economic Statistics, American Statistical Association, vol. 5(2), pages 233-242, April.
    3. Filippini, Massimo & Masiero, Giuliano & Moschetti, Karine, 2006. "Socioeconomic determinants of regional differences in outpatient antibiotic consumption: Evidence from Switzerland," Health Policy, Elsevier, vol. 78(1), pages 77-92, August.
    4. Alston, Julian M & Foster, Kenneth A & Green, Richard D, 1994. "Estimating Elasticities with the Linear Approximate Almost Ideal Demand System: Some Monte Carlo Results," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 76(2), pages 351-356, May.
    5. Michael Baye & Robert Maness & Steven Wiggins, 1997. "Demand systems and the true subindex of the cost of living for pharmaceuticals," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 29(9), pages 1179-1190.
    6. Brenda L. Boetel & Donald J. Liu, 2003. "Evaluating the effect of generic advertising and food health information within a meat demand system," Agribusiness, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 19(3), pages 345-354.
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    More about this item


    Antibiotic use; Demand equations; Demand elasticities; Almost Ideal Model; Self-dispensing;

    JEL classification:

    • I0 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - General
    • C3 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Multiple or Simultaneous Equation Models; Multiple Variables
    • C43 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric and Statistical Methods: Special Topics - - - Index Numbers and Aggregation

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