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Participation in lifelong learning in Portugal and the UK

  • Hilary Ingham
  • Mike Ingham
  • Jose Adelino Afonso

Lifelong learning (LLL) has now been on the agenda of the European Union and other major international organizations for some considerable time, with the European institutions stressing the need that such learning should be available to all, especially hard to reach groups. This paper seeks to explore LLL participation in Portugal and the UK, two countries at opposite ends of the adult learning spectrum and having very different labour market and educational contexts. Using Labour Force Survey data, the results reveal that universal penetration remains a challenge to be overcome, regardless of the setting. The barriers to its achievement, however, appear to be very different. In Portugal, there is an evident need for the learning culture to diffuse more widely throughout the population whereas, in the UK, the problem has its roots in the concentration of LLL amongst the better educated and those in the upper echelons of the occupational hierarchy.

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Paper provided by Lancaster University Management School, Economics Department in its series Working Papers with number 41842845.

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Date of creation: 2013
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Handle: RePEc:lan:wpaper:41842845
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  1. Andrew Jenkins & Tarek Mostafa, 2013. "Learning and Wellbeing Trajectories Among Older Adults in England," DoQSS Working Papers 13-02, Department of Quantitative Social Science - UCL Institute of Education, University College London.
  2. Wallette, MÃ¥rten, 2005. "Temporary Jobs and On-the-Job Training in Sweden - A Negative Nexus?," Working Papers 2005:13, Lund University, Department of Economics.
  3. Fernando Galindo-Rueda & Andrew Jenkins & Anna Vignoles & Alison Wolf, 2002. "The Determinants and Effects of Lifelong Learning," CEE Discussion Papers 0019, Centre for the Economics of Education, LSE.
  4. David H. Autor, 2000. "Why Do Temporary Help Firms Provide Free General Skills Training?," NBER Working Papers 7637, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  5. J. T. Addison & C. J. Surfield, 2009. "Does atypical work help the jobless? Evidence from a CAEAS/CPS cohort analysis," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 41(9), pages 1077-1087.
  6. Bassanini, Andrea & Booth, Alison L. & Brunello, Giorgio & De Paola, Maria & Leuven, Edwin, 2005. "Workplace Training in Europe," IZA Discussion Papers 1640, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
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