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Role of Financial and Productivity Shocks in the US and Japan: A Two-Country Economy


  • Yue ZHAO

    () (yGraduate School of Economics, Kyoto University)


Jermann and Quadrini (2012) show that compared with productivity shocks, direct shocks to the credit system (" nancial shocks") have contributed to the most frequently observed dynamics of both real and nancial variables in the US within a closed economy framework. We develop a simple two-country model featuring an international bond market and enforcement constraints within both countries in an attempt to quantify the role of productivity and nancial shocks. We construct time series of productivity shocks and nancial shocks using the US and Japanese quarterly data since 2001 and conduct simultaneous replication on major indicators of real variables and aggregate nancial ows. The main results were as follows. First, for both the US and Japan, productivity shocks account for most real variable dynamics such as output and investment, while nancial shocks well capture the trend of consumption, current account, and labor trends in the US and succeed in replicating Japan's debt repurchase behavior. Nevertheless, it is noteworthy that nancial shocks served as key factors in accounting for the observed troughs of output, labor, and consumption, as well as the peaks of debt repurchase and the US current account during the 2007-09 nancial crisis. Second, it is surprising that observable international spillover e ect appeared only in Japan's debt repurchases. As it is widely considered that the Japanese economy have been deeply in uenced by US economic uctuations, our quantitative results raise questions about this opinion.

Suggested Citation

  • Yue ZHAO, 2013. "Role of Financial and Productivity Shocks in the US and Japan: A Two-Country Economy," KIER Working Papers 881, Kyoto University, Institute of Economic Research.
  • Handle: RePEc:kyo:wpaper:881

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Kuroda, Sachiko & Yamamoto, Isamu, 2008. "Estimating Frisch labor supply elasticity in Japan," Journal of the Japanese and International Economies, Elsevier, vol. 22(4), pages 566-585, December.
    2. Michael B. Devereux & James Yetman, 2010. "Leverage Constraints and the International Transmission of Shocks," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 42(s1), pages 71-105, September.
    3. Robert Kollmann, 2013. "Global Banks, Financial Shocks, and International Business Cycles: Evidence from an Estimated Model," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 45(s2), pages 159-195, December.
    4. Nobuhiro Kiyotaki & Gauti Eggertsson & Andrea Ferrero & Marco Del Negro, 2010. "The Great Escape? A Quantitative Evaluation of the Fed’s Non-Standard Policies," 2010 Meeting Papers 113, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    5. Keisuke Otsu, 2009. "International Business Cycle Accounting," IMES Discussion Paper Series 09-E-29, Institute for Monetary and Economic Studies, Bank of Japan.
    6. Mendoza, Enrique G. & Smith, Katherine A., 2006. "Quantitative implications of a debt-deflation theory of Sudden Stops and asset prices," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 70(1), pages 82-114, September.
    7. Sohei Kaihatsu & Takushi Kurozumi, 2014. "Sources of Business Fluctuations: Financial or Technology Shocks?," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 17(2), pages 224-242, April.
    8. Chakraborty, Suparna, 2009. "The boom and the bust of the Japanese economy: A quantitative look at the period 1980-2000," Japan and the World Economy, Elsevier, vol. 21(1), pages 116-131, January.
    9. Keisuke Otsu, 2011. "Accounting for Japanese Business Cycles: A Quest for Labor Wedges," Monetary and Economic Studies, Institute for Monetary and Economic Studies, Bank of Japan, vol. 29, pages 143-170, November.
    10. Kollmann, Robert & Enders, Zeno & Müller, Gernot J., 2011. "Global banking and international business cycles," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 55(3), pages 407-426, April.
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    More about this item


    Business uctuations; nancial friction; open economy; simulation;

    JEL classification:

    • E32 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Business Fluctuations; Cycles
    • E37 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Forecasting and Simulation: Models and Applications
    • E44 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates - - - Financial Markets and the Macroeconomy
    • F41 - International Economics - - Macroeconomic Aspects of International Trade and Finance - - - Open Economy Macroeconomics

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