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Taxation if Capital is not Perfectly Mobile: Tax Competition versus Tax Exportation

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  • Sylvester C.W. Eijffinger
  • Wolf Wagner

Abstract

This paper analyzes the tax competition and tax exporting effect of financial integration. On the one hand, financial integration increases capital mobility and thus the incentive for countries to compete for capital. On the other hand, financial integration increases foreign ownership of firms and capital and allows for exportation of source taxes. Both effects have contrary implications for capital taxes. Allowing for imperfectly mobile capital, our analysis suggests that currently the tax exportation effect is dominating, which implies excessive capital taxation. From studying the benchmark of full financial integration we find that capital taxes are likely to increase from current levels. We further examine the tax exportation effect empirically and find that is significant as well as quantitatively important for the U.S.

Suggested Citation

  • Sylvester C.W. Eijffinger & Wolf Wagner, "undated". "Taxation if Capital is not Perfectly Mobile: Tax Competition versus Tax Exportation," EPRU Working Paper Series 02-07, Economic Policy Research Unit (EPRU), University of Copenhagen. Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:kud:epruwp:02-07
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Huizinga, Harry & Nielsen, Soren Bo, 1997. "Capital income and profit taxation with foreign ownership of firms," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, pages 149-165.
    2. Razin, Assaf & Sadka, Efraim, 1991. "International tax competition and gains from tax harmonization," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 37(1), pages 69-76, September.
    3. Hines, James R. Jr., 1999. "Lessons From Behavioral Responses to International Taxation," National Tax Journal, National Tax Association, vol. 52(2), pages 305-322, June.
    4. Desai, Mihir A. & Foley, C. Fritz & Hines, James Jr., 2004. "Foreign direct investment in a world of multiple taxes," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, pages 2727-2744.
    5. Peter Birch Sørensen, 2001. "International Tax Coordination: Regionalism Versus Globalism," CESifo Working Paper Series 483, CESifo Group Munich.
    6. Swenson, Deborah L., 1994. "The impact of U.S. tax reform on foreign direct investment in the United States," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 54(2), pages 243-266, June.
    7. Eckhard Janeba, 2000. "Tax Competition When Governments Lack Commitment: Excess Capacity as a Countervailing Threat," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 90(5), pages 1508-1519, December.
    8. Hines, James R. Jr., 1999. "Lessons from Behavioral Responses to International Taxation," National Tax Journal, National Tax Association, vol. 52(n. 2), pages 305-22, June.
    9. Lee, Kangoh, 1997. "Tax Competition with Imperfectly Mobile Capital," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 42(2), pages 222-242, September.
    10. Peter Birch Sørensen, "undated". "International Tax Coordination: Regionalism versus Globalism," EPRU Working Paper Series 01-08, Economic Policy Research Unit (EPRU), University of Copenhagen. Department of Economics.
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    Cited by:

    1. Stéphane Guimbert, 2002. "Réformes de la fiscalité du capital en Europe," Revue Française d'Économie, Programme National Persée, vol. 16(4), pages 113-169.
    2. Huizinga, Harry & Nicodeme, Gaetan, 2006. "Foreign ownership and corporate income taxation: An empirical evaluation," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 50(5), pages 1223-1244, July.
    3. Wolf Wagner, 2007. "International Risk Sharing and Government Moral Hazard," Open Economies Review, Springer, vol. 18(5), pages 577-598, November.
    4. Signe Krogstrup, 2004. "Are Corporate Tax Burdens Racing to the Bottom in the European Union?," EPRU Working Paper Series 04-04, Economic Policy Research Unit (EPRU), University of Copenhagen. Department of Economics.
    5. Signe Krogstrup, 2008. "Standard Tax Competition and Increasing Returns," Journal of Public Economic Theory, Association for Public Economic Theory, vol. 10(4), pages 547-561, August.
    6. Leon Bettendorf & Joeri Gorter & Albert van der Horst, 2006. "Who benefits from tax competition in the European Union?," CPB Document 125, CPB Netherlands Bureau for Economic Policy Analysis.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • F20 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - General

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