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Toward an International Comparison of Economic and Educational Mobility: Recent Findings from the Japan Child Panel Survey

Author

Listed:
  • Hideo Akabayashi

    (Faculty of Economics, Keio University)

  • Ryosuke Nakamura

    (Faculty of Economics, Fukuoka University)

  • Michio Naoi

    (Faculty of Economics, Keio University)

  • Chizuru Shikishima

    (Department of Psychology, Faculty of Liberal Arts, Teikyo)

Abstract

In past decades, income inequality has risen in most developed countries. There is growing interest among economists in international comparisons of economic and educational mobility. This is aided by the availability of internationally comparable, large-scale data. The present paper aims to make three contributions. First, we introduce the Japan Child Panel Survey (JCPS), the first longitudinal survey of school-age children that includes cognitive and non-cognitive measures, and rich household information. The JCPS was developed to measure dynamic inter-relationships between children's academic and social outcomes, their family background, and local policy and environment, in a way that allows comparison of the results with international data. Second, based on JCPS data, we present selected results of the dynamics of inequality in multiple indicators of children's educational and behavioral outcomes. We found that changes in cognitive achievement across parental income groups, the degree of mobility of cognitive test scores, and the correlation between the difficulty score and parental education in Japan are similar to other countries, such as the United States, United Kingdom, Australia, and Germany. Finally we discuss issues underlying the globalization of education research based on our experiences with the JCPS. We discuss reasons and strategies for further globalization of education research in Japan, and propose suggestions as to how Japanese education research can move toward better international collaboration, particularly in research on economic and educational mobility.

Suggested Citation

  • Hideo Akabayashi & Ryosuke Nakamura & Michio Naoi & Chizuru Shikishima, 2015. "Toward an International Comparison of Economic and Educational Mobility: Recent Findings from the Japan Child Panel Survey," Keio-IES Discussion Paper Series 2015-010, Institute for Economics Studies, Keio University.
  • Handle: RePEc:keo:dpaper:2015-010
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Miles Corak, 2013. "Income Inequality, Equality of Opportunity, and Intergenerational Mobility," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 27(3), pages 79-102, Summer.
    2. Hiroko Ikesako & Koji Miyamoto, 2015. "Fostering social and emotional skills through families, schools and communities: Summary of international evidence and implication for Japan's educational practices and research," OECD Education Working Papers 121, OECD Publishing.
    3. Carneiro, Pedro & Heckman, James J., 2003. "Human Capital Policy," IZA Discussion Papers 821, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    4. Hanushek, Eric A. & Woessmann, Ludger, 2015. "The Knowledge Capital of Nations: Education and the Economics of Growth," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 1, volume 1, number 0262029170, September.
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    Cited by:

    1. Michio Naoi & Hideo Akabayashi & Ryosuke Nakamura & Kayo Nozaki & Shinpei Sano & Wataru Senoh & Chizuru Shikishima, 2017. "Causal Effects of Family Income on Child Outcomes and Educational Spending: Evidence from a Child Allowance Policy Reform in Japan," Keio-IES Discussion Paper Series 2017-026, Institute for Economics Studies, Keio University.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Economic Inequality; Family Background; Educational Inequality and Mobility; Panel Data; Cognitive and Non-cognitive Abilities;

    JEL classification:

    • D31 - Microeconomics - - Distribution - - - Personal Income and Wealth Distribution
    • I24 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Education and Inequality
    • J13 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Fertility; Family Planning; Child Care; Children; Youth

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